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Skill and Australia's productivity surge


  • Paula Barnes

    (Productivity Commission)

  • Sharon Kennard

    (Productivity Commission)


Skill and Australia’s Productivity Surge examines the changing demand for skills and the effect of increased skill on productivity growth. It finds that Australia’s productivity surge post 1993-94 was mainly due to factors other than the increase in the skill of the workforce.

Suggested Citation

  • Paula Barnes & Sharon Kennard, 2002. "Skill and Australia's productivity surge," Labor and Demography 0210001, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0210001
    Note: Type of Document - Word 97; prepared on IBM PC; to print on HP; pages: 84; figures: included

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Stefano Scarpetta & Andrea Bassanini & Dirk Pilat & Paul Schreyer, 2000. "Economic Growth in the OECD Area: Recent Trends at the Aggregate and Sectoral Level," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 248, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Parham, Dean, 2005. "Les gains de productivité au moyen de l’usage des technologies de l’information : l’expérience australienne," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 81(1), pages 143-164, Mars-Juin.
    2. Michael Keating, 2003. "The Labour Market and Inequality," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 36(4), pages 374-396.

    More about this item


    skill - productivity - labour - MFP - employment;

    JEL classification:

    • D - Microeconomics

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