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Do Individual Investors Drive Post-Earnings Announcement Drift? Direct Evidence from Personal Trades


  • David Hirshleifer

    (Fisher College of Business, Ohio State University)

  • James N. Myers

    (University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign)

  • Linda A. Myers

    (University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign - Department of Accountancy)

  • Siew Hong Teoh

    (Fisher College of Business, Ohio State University)


This study examines whether individual investors are the source of post- earnings announcement drift (PEAD). We provide evidence on how individual investors trade in response to extreme quarterly earnings surprises and on the relation between individual investors' trades and subsequent abnormal returns. We find no evidence that either individuals or any sub-category of individuals in our sample cause PEAD. Individuals are significant net buyers after both negative and positive earnings surprises. There is no indication that trading by any of our investor sub-categories explains the concentration of drift at subsequent earnings announcement dates. While post-announcement individual net buying is a significant negative predictor of stock returns over the next three quarters, individual investor trading fails to subsume any of the power of extreme earnings surprises to predict future abnormal returns.

Suggested Citation

  • David Hirshleifer & James N. Myers & Linda A. Myers & Siew Hong Teoh, 2004. "Do Individual Investors Drive Post-Earnings Announcement Drift? Direct Evidence from Personal Trades," Finance 0412003, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpfi:0412003
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 40. PDF

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jia Chen & Kewei Hou & René M. Stulz, 2015. "Are Firms in "Boring" Industries Worth Less?," NBER Working Papers 20880, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Fabrizio Lillo & Salvatore Miccichè & Michele Tumminello & Jyrki Piilo & Rosario N. Mantegna, 2015. "How news affects the trading behaviour of different categories of investors in a financial market," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 213-229, February.
    3. Lawrence, Alastair, 2013. "Individual investors and financial disclosure," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 130-147.
    4. Ron Kaniel & Shuming Liu & Gideon Saar & Sheridan Titman, 2012. "Individual Investor Trading and Return Patterns around Earnings Announcements," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 67(2), pages 639-680, April.
    5. Battalio, Robert H. & Mendenhall, Richard R., 2005. "Earnings expectations, investor trade size, and anomalous returns around earnings announcements," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 289-319, August.
    6. G. Geoffrey Booth & Juha-Pekka Kallunki & Petri Sahlström & Jaakko Tyynelä, 2011. "Foreign vs domestic investors and the post-announcement drift," International Journal of Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 7(3), pages 220-237, June.
    7. Norio Kitagawa & Shin' ya Okuda, 2013. "Management Forecasts, Idiosyncratic Risk, and Information Environment," Discussion Papers 2013-38, Kobe University, Graduate School of Business Administration, revised Jul 2013.
    8. Weber, Martin & Welfens, Frank, 2007. "The repurchase behavior of individual investors : an experimental investigation," Papers 07-44, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
    9. Campbell, John Y. & Ramadorai, Tarun & Schwartz, Allie, 2009. "Caught on tape: Institutional trading, stock returns, and earnings announcements," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 66-91, April.
    10. Danny Lo, 2015. "Essays in Market Microstructure and Investor Trading," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 22.
    11. David O. Lucca & Emanuel Moench, 2015. "The Pre-FOMC Announcement Drift," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 70(1), pages 329-371, February.
    12. Chen, Zhijuan & Lin, William T. & Ma, Changfeng & Tsai, Shih-Chuan, 2014. "Liquidity provisions by individual investor trading prior to dividend announcements: Evidence from Taiwan," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 358-374.
    13. Philipp Stephan & Rüdiger Nitzsch, 2013. "Do individual investors’ stock recommendations in online communities contain investment value?," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer;Swiss Society for Financial Market Research, vol. 27(2), pages 149-186, June.
    14. Frieder, Laura, 2008. "Investor and price response to patterns in earnings surprises," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 259-283, August.
    15. Amil Dasgupta & Andrea Prat & Michela Verardo, 2011. "Institutional Trade Persistence and Long‐Term Equity Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(2), pages 635-653, April.
    16. Efendi, Jap & Park, Jin Dong & Smith, L. Murphy, 2014. "Do XBRL filings enhance informational efficiency? Early evidence from post-earnings announcement drift," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(6), pages 1099-1105.
    17. Rongsheng Shi & Zhi Xu & Zhengrong Chen & Jing Huang, 2012. "Does attention affect individual investors' investment return?," China Finance Review International, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(2), pages 143-162, April.

    More about this item


    post earnings-announcement drift; trading activity; individual investors; market efficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • G - Financial Economics

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