IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Why does the GARCH(1,1) model fail to provide sensible longer- horizon volatility forecasts?

  • Catalin Starica

    (Chalmers & Gothenburg University)

  • Stefano Herzel

    (University of Perugia)

  • Tomas Nord

    (Chalmers University of Technology)

The paper investigates from an empirical perspective aspects related to the occurrence of the IGARCH effect and to its impact on volatility forecasting. It reports the results of a detailed analysis of twelve samples of returns on financial indexes from major economies (Australia, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, UK, and US). The study is conducted in a novel, non-stationary modeling framework proposed in Starica and Granger (2005). The analysis shows that samples characterized by more pronounced changes in the unconditional variance display stronger IGARCH effect and pronounced differences between estimated GARCH(1,1) unconditional variance and the sample variance. Moreover, we document particularly poor longer-horizon forecasting performance of the GARCH(1,1) model for samples characterized by strong discrepancy between the two measures of unconditional variance. The periods of poor forecasting behavior can be as long as four years. The forecasting behavior is evaluated through a direct comparison with a naive non-stationary approach and is based on mean square errors (MSE) as well as on an option replicating exercise.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Econometrics with number 0508003.

in new window

Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 02 Aug 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpem:0508003
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 35
Contact details of provider: Web page:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Hamilton, James D. & Susmel, Raul, 1994. "Autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity and changes in regime," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1-2), pages 307-333.
  2. Robert F. Engle & Alex Kane & Jaesun Noh, 1993. "Index-Option Pricing with Stochastic Volatility and the Value of Accurate Variance Forecasts," NBER Working Papers 4519, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Thomas Mikosch & Catalin Starica, 2004. "Non-stationarities in financial time series, the long range dependence and the IGARCH effects," Econometrics 0412005, EconWPA.
  4. Lamoureux, Christopher G & Lastrapes, William D, 1990. "Persistence in Variance, Structural Change, and the GARCH Model," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 8(2), pages 225-34, April.
  5. Cătălin Stărică & Clive Granger, 2005. "Nonstationarities in Stock Returns," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(3), pages 503-522, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpem:0508003. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.