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Effect of business subsidies on labour demand: overall evaluation with regional extensions

  • Kangasharju, Aki

    ()

  • Venetoklis, Takis

    ()

This paper investigates the effects of business subsidies on the employment of firms, and explores possible regional differences in the effects. Employment of firms is annually followed between 1995-1998. We find that employment subsidies increase firms' own employment payroll on average by 5.0 - 5.5 per cent. At the average values however, the marginal effect of subsidies is 10 percent, i.e. one Euro higher subsidy increases subsidies by 10 cents. This suggests that the proportion of subsidies of the average-waged employee is as high as 91 per cent. In contrast, we do not find positive or negative effect of Investment and operation subsidies or R&D subsidies on employment of firms. Finally, regional results show that the subsidy effects have been slightly stronger in central areas of Finland than in countryside, suggesting that employment subsidies have contributed to divergence of regional economies in Finland.

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File URL: http://www-sre.wu-wien.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa02/cd-rom/papers/172.pdf
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Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa02p172.

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Date of creation: Aug 2002
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa02p172
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  1. Douglas A. Irwin & Peter J. Klenow, 1994. "High Tech R&D Subsidies: Estimating the Effects of Sematech," NBER Working Papers 4974, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Tor Jakob Klette & Jarle Møen & Zvi Griliches, 1999. "Do Subsidies to Commercial R&D Reduce Market Failures? Microeconomic Evaluation Studies," NBER Working Papers 6947, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Timothy Dunne & Mark J. Roberts & Larry Samuelson, 1988. "Patterns of Firm Entry and Exit in U.S. Manufacturing Industries," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 19(4), pages 495-515, Winter.
  4. Roper, Stephen & Hewitt-Dundas, Nola, 2001. "Grant Assistance and Small Firm Development in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 48(1), pages 99-117, February.
  5. Klette, Tor Jakob & Møen, Jarle, 2011. "R&D investment responses to R&D subsidies: A theoretical analysis and a microeconometric study," Discussion Papers 2011/15, Department of Business and Management Science, Norwegian School of Economics.
  6. Saul Lach, 2000. "Do R&D Subsidies Stimulate or Displace Private R&D? Evidence from Israel," NBER Working Papers 7943, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Fuest, Clemens & Huber, Bernd, 2000. "Why do governments subsidise investment and not employment?," Munich Reprints in Economics 20295, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  8. Payne, A. Abigail, 1998. "Does the government crowd-out private donations? New evidence from a sample of non-profit firms," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 323-345, September.
  9. Fuest, Clemens & Huber, Bernd, 2000. "Why do governments subsidise investment and not employment?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(1-2), pages 171-192, October.
  10. Takis Venetoklis, 1999. "Process Evaluation of Business Subsidies in Finland. A Quantitative Approach," Research Reports 58, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).
  11. George A. Akerlof & Andrew K. Rose & Janet L. Yellen & Helga Hessenius, 1991. "East Germany in from the Cold: The Economic Aftermath of Currency Union," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 22(1), pages 1-106.
  12. Branstetter, Lee & Sakakibara, Mariko, 1998. "Japanese Research Consortia: A Microeconometric Analysis of Industrial Policy," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 207-33, June.
  13. Begg, David & Portes, Richard, 1992. "Eastern Germany Since Unification: Wage Subsidies Remain a Better Way," CEPR Discussion Papers 730, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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