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What About Us? Men’s Issues in Development

Author

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  • Joyce P. Jacobsen

    (Department of Economics, Wesleyan University)

Abstract

This report examines male gender issues and their potential negative impact on male development. It finds that HIV/AIDS, substance abuse, occupational injury, violence, and incarceration and other forms of institutionalization is proportionately affect men. Moreover, changing work patterns have modified traditional male roles in the family and community, and not all men have been capable of adapting to the new social context. The report highlights the limitations of existing research on male issues, and also on the lack of adequate programs to address these issues on the ground. It concludes by recommending that existing development policies and programs incorporate men into their work, and that new ones be designed specifically to target male issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2002. "What About Us? Men’s Issues in Development," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2002-001, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wes:weswpa:2002-001
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    File URL: http://repec.wesleyan.edu/pdf/jjacobsen/2002001_jacobsen.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Single, E. & Robson, L. & Rehm, J. & Xi, X., 1999. "Morbidity and mortality attributable to alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use in Canada," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 89(3), pages 385-390.
    2. Bjornson, W. & Rand, C. & Connett, J.E. & Lindgren, P. & Nides, M. & Pope, F. & Buist, A.S. & Hoppe-Ryan, C. & O'Hara, P., 1995. "Gender differences in smoking cessation after 3 years in the Lung Health Study," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 85(2), pages 223-230.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2012. "Gender and the Economic Impacts of War," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2012-008, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.

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