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Understanding the Global Demand Collapse: Empirical Analysis and Optimal Policy Response

Author

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  • Guido Cazzavillan

    () (Department of Economics, University Of Venice C� Foscari)

  • Michael Donadelli

    (Department of Economics, University Of Venice C� Foscari)

Abstract

The goal of this project is to deeply investigate on the main causes of the global economic and financial crises and, based on a theoretical framework, to describe a suitable optimal monetary policy. According to our empirical analysis (basically based on US data) we will prove that a mix of extraordinary conditions have been crucial for the origin, develop and growth of the recent crisis. In finding what has been the main cause of such collapse we will prove that the credit crunch has played a crucial role, especially as a sort of contractionary monetary policy. We will also discuss the quantitative easing policies implemented by the Central Banks. Finally, we will seek to establish, by using an existing theoretical model and given extraordinary market conditions, in what central banks were wrong, and if so, where they made mistakes.

Suggested Citation

  • Guido Cazzavillan & Michael Donadelli, 2010. "Understanding the Global Demand Collapse: Empirical Analysis and Optimal Policy Response," Working Papers 2010_18, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  • Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2010_18
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Blanchard, Olivier J, 1981. "Output, the Stock Market, and Interest Rates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(1), pages 132-143, March.
    2. Michael Ehrmann & Marcel Fratzscher, 2009. "Global Financial Transmission of Monetary Policy Shocks," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(6), pages 739-759, December.
    3. Nicholas Bloom, 2009. "The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(3), pages 623-685, May.
    4. Stijn Claessens & Luc Laeven & Deniz O Igan & Giovanni Dell'Ariccia, 2010. "Lessons and Policy Implications from the Global Financial Crisis," IMF Working Papers 10/44, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Agmon, Tamir, 1972. "The Relations Among Equity Markets: A Study of Share Price Co-Movements in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany and Japan," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 27(4), pages 839-855, September.
    6. Geoffrey Shuetrim & Christopher Thompson, 2003. "The Implications of Uncertainty for Monetary Policy," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 79(246), pages 370-379, September.
    7. Calista Cheung & Stéphanie Guichard, 2009. "Understanding the World Trade Collapse," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 729, OECD Publishing.
    8. Richard T. Froyen & Alfred V. Guender, 2007. "Optimal Monetary Policy under Uncertainty," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 12510, April.
    9. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1976. "Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(6), pages 1161-1176, December.
    10. Grubel, Herbert G & Fadner, Kenneth, 1971. "The Interdependence of International Equity Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 26(1), pages 89-94, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Donadelli, Michael & Paradiso, Antonio, 2014. "Does financial integration affect real exchange rate volatility and cross-country equity market returns correlation?," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 206-220.
    2. Smimou, K., 2014. "Consumer attitudes, stock market liquidity, and the macro economy: A Canadian perspective," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 186-209.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic and Financial Crisis; Credit Crunch; Optimal Monetary Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E01 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Measurement and Data on National Income and Product Accounts and Wealth; Environmental Accounts
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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