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Formal and Informal Sectors in China and India: An Accounting-Based Approach

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  • Codrina Rada

Abstract

This paper discusses the estimation of a social accounting matrix that distinguishes between formal and informal activities for China and India for 2000 and 1998-99 respectively. Wage shares for the formal/informal employment for China and net domestic product shares for the formal/informal sectors for India are being applied as weights to the input-output tables and flow of funds tables provided by official statistics. While some estimation techniques used in this paper remain vulnerable to criticism, the proposed methodology is a first step towards an integrated approach to account for the dualism of many economies in the developing world. The results are important data input for any policy-driven CGE model for developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Codrina Rada, 2009. "Formal and Informal Sectors in China and India: An Accounting-Based Approach," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2009_02, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uta:papers:2009_02
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Angus Deaton, 2003. "Adjusted Indian Poverty Estimates for 1999-2000," Working Papers 200, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
    2. repec:pri:rpdevs:deaton_adjusted_poverty_india is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ravallion, Martin & Chen, Shaohua, 2007. "China's (uneven) progress against poverty," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 1-42, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vasco Gabriel & Paul Levine & Joseph Pearlman & Bo Yang, 2010. "An Estimated DSGE Model of the Indian Economy," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1210, School of Economics, University of Surrey.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    informal sector; social accounting matrix; comparative economic systems; China; India;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E01 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Measurement and Data on National Income and Product Accounts and Wealth; Environmental Accounts
    • E26 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Informal Economy; Underground Economy
    • P44 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - National Income, Product, and Expenditure; Money; Inflation

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