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Parental leave within the broader work‐family trajectory : What can we learn from sequence analysis?

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  • Zhelyazkova N.

    (UNU-MERIT)

Abstract

This paper illustrates how sequence analysis can be used to analyse work-family reconciliation strategies of parents and in particular the role of parental leave in these strategies. The use of administrative records makes a detailed, longitudinal analysis possible, which enables a holistic approach to the question from the broader life-course view. In addition, as an explorative technique, sequence analysis results are a powerful instrument for formulating further research questions. For the paper anonymous administrative records of mothers and fathersworking in Luxembourg are used.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhelyazkova N., 2013. "Parental leave within the broader work‐family trajectory : What can we learn from sequence analysis?," MERIT Working Papers 2013-049, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2013049
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2013/wp2013-049.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    7. Gabadinho, Alexis & Ritschard, Gilbert & Müller, Nicolas S & Studer, Matthias, 2011. "Analyzing and Visualizing State Sequences in R with TraMineR," Journal of Statistical Software, Foundation for Open Access Statistics, vol. 40(i04).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination; Demographic Economics; Public Policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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