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Trends in Growth Convergence and Divergence and Changes in Technological Access and Capabilities

Author

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  • Hollanders, Hugo
  • Soete, Luc
  • Weel, Bas ter

    (MERIT)

Abstract

This paper goes into detail in the pattern of growth over the last thirty to forty years at the world level. A model is developed in which different aspects of technological change and their influence on growth will be outlined. This model is used in estimations for cross-country OECD-samples of 1973-1996 growth paths, as well as in panel databases for yearly growth rates over the 1973-1996 period. In addition, an analytical technique is developed which identifies different empirical sources for specific convergence or divergence trends within the OECD area. Moreover, we show that traditional factors are only partially able to explain the recent divergence relative to the US. Hence, we introduce ‘new’ factors explaining this trend.

Suggested Citation

  • Hollanders, Hugo & Soete, Luc & Weel, Bas ter, 1999. "Trends in Growth Convergence and Divergence and Changes in Technological Access and Capabilities," Research Memorandum 018, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umamer:1999018
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/rmpdf/1999/rm1999-018.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Moses Abramovitz, 1979. "Rapid Growth Potential and its Realisation: The Experience of Capitalist Economies in the Postwar Period," International Economic Association Series, in: Edmond Malinvaud (ed.), Economic Growth and Resources, chapter 1, pages 1-51, Palgrave Macmillan.
    2. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(2), pages 385-406, June.
    3. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 1998. "The Origins of Technology-Skill Complementarity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(3), pages 693-732.
    4. Baumol, William J, 1986. "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: What the Long-run Data Show," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 1072-1085, December.
    5. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    6. Ben-David, Dan & Loewy, Michael B, 1998. "Free Trade, Growth, and Convergence," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 3(2), pages 143-170, June.
    7. Richard R. Nelson, 1995. "Recent Evolutionary Theorizing about Economic Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(1), pages 48-90, March.
    8. Chris Freeman & Luc Soete, 1997. "The Economics of Industrial Innovation, 3rd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 3, volume 1, number 0262061953, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Harry Bloch & Jerry Courvisanos & Maria Mangano, 2011. "The Impact of Technical Change and Profit on Investment in Australian Manufacturing," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 389-408.
    2. Shin-Horng Shen & Meng-Chun Liu & Hui-Tzu Shih, 2003. "R&D Services and Global Production Networks: A Taiwanese Perspective," Economics Study Area Working Papers 52, East-West Center, Economics Study Area.
    3. Ivan Angelov, 2004. "Accelerated Economic Development – Theory and Practice," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 1, pages 3-33.
    4. Courvisanos, Jerry, 2000. "The Dynamics of Innovation and Investment, with application to Australia 1984 - 1998," Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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