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How Cash Transfers Boost Work and Economic Security

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  • Guy Standing

Abstract

There has long been a minority view that providing people with cash is an effective way of combating poverty and economic insecurity while promoting livelihoods and work. The mainstream view has been that giving people money, without conditions or obligations, promotes idleness and dependency, while being unnecessarily costly. Better, they contend, would be to allocate the available money to schemes that create jobs and/or human capital and that produce infrastructure. This paper reviews recent evidence on various types of scheme and on several pilot cash transfer schemes, assessing them by reference to principles of social justice.

Suggested Citation

  • Guy Standing, 2007. "How Cash Transfers Boost Work and Economic Security," Working Papers 58, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
  • Handle: RePEc:une:wpaper:58
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    File URL: http://www.un.org/esa/desa/papers/2007/wp58_2007.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Coady & Margaret Grosh & John Hoddinott, 2004. "Targeting of Transfers in Developing Countries : Review of Lessons and Experience," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14902.
    2. Case, Anne & Deaton, Angus, 1998. "Large Cash Transfers to the Elderly in South Africa," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(450), pages 1330-1361, September.
    3. Ravallion, Martin, 2003. "Targeted transfers in poor countries : revisiting the tradeoffs and policy options," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3048, The World Bank.
    4. Subbarao, Kalanidhi, 2003. "Systemic shocks and social protection : role and effectiveness of public works programs," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 25606, The World Bank.
    5. Subbarao,Kalanidhi, 2003. "Systemic shocks and social protection : role and effectiveness of public works programs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 25606, The World Bank.
    6. Nanak Kakwani & Fabio Veras Soares & Hyun H. Son, 2005. "Conditional cash transfers in African countries," Working Papers 9, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    7. Palacios, Robert & Sluchynsky, Oleksiy, 2006. "Social pensions Part I : their role in the overall pension system," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 36237, The World Bank.
    8. Estanislao Gacitua-Mario & Quentin Wodon, 2001. "Measurement and Meaning : Combining Quantitative and Qualitative Methods for the Analysis of Poverty and Social Exclusion in Latin America," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14035.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rodríguez, Luis C. & Pascual, Unai & Muradian, Roldan & Pazmino, Nathalie & Whitten, Stuart, 2011. "Towards a unified scheme for environmental and social protection: Learning from PES and CCT experiences in developing countries," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 2163-2174, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food aid; vouchers; cash transfers; economic security; public works; social pensions; disability grants; social policy;

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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