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The Growth and Valuation of Generic Skills

  • Andy Dickerson

    ()

  • Francis Green

    ()

Using a method for measuring job skills derived from survey data on detailed work activities, we show that between 1997 and 2001 there was a growth in Britain in the utilisation of computing skills, literacy, numeracy, technical know-how, high level communication skills, planning skills, client communication skills, horizontal communication skills, problem-solving and checking skills. Computer skills and high-level communication skills carry positive wage premia, as shown both in cross-section hedonic wage equations and through a within-cohorts change analysis. No part of the gender pay gap can be accounted for by differences in levels of generic skills between men and women.

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File URL: ftp://ftp.ukc.ac.uk/pub/ejr/RePEc/ukc/ukcedp/0203.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Kent in its series Studies in Economics with number 0203.

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Date of creation: May 2002
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Handle: RePEc:ukc:ukcedp:0203
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School of Economics, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NP

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Web page: http://www.kent.ac.uk/economics/

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  1. Deaton, Angus, 1985. "Panel data from time series of cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 109-126.
  2. Freeman, Richard & Schettkat, Ronald, 2001. "Skill Compression, Wage Differentials, and Employment: Germany vs the US," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 582-603, July.
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  8. Murnane, Richard J & Willett, John B & Levy, Frank, 1995. "The Growing Importance of Cognitive Skills in Wage Determination," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 251-66, May.
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  12. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Christoph M. Schmidt, 1999. "Money for Nothing and Your Chips for Free?: The Anatomy of the PC Wage Differential," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 178, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  13. Entorf, Horst & Kramarz, Francis, 1997. "Does unmeasured ability explain the higher wages of new technology workers?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(8), pages 1489-1509, August.
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  15. Lucas, Robert E B, 1977. "Hedonic Wage Equations and Psychic Wages in the Returns to Schooling," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(4), pages 549-58, September.
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  17. James Heckman & Jose Scheinkman, 1987. "The Importance of Bundling in a Gorman-Lancaster Model of Earnings," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(2), pages 243-255.
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