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Is it Possible to Go Back to Ad Hoc Macroeconomic Models? The Case of the Romer-Taylor Model

  • Alejandro Rodríguez Arana

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City. Mexico)

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    In absence of fiscal stabilizing rules, the original Romer-Taylor model is unstable in the issuing of government bonds. Adding a wealth effect to the consumption function seems reasonable to provide rationality to the consumers, but that destabilize even more the Romer-Taylor’s framework. A fiscal stabilizing rule, where there is a tax on the wealth effect for consumers, may stabilize output, inflation and the government budget constraint in the long run. In this context, the renewed Romer-Taylor model constitutes a good instrument to provide policy prescriptions.

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    Paper provided by Universidad Iberoamericana, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0312.

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    Date of creation: 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:uic:wpaper:0312
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    1. Buiter, Willem H., 1982. "Predetermined and non-predetermined variables in rational expectations models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 10(1-2), pages 49-54.
    2. Olivier J. Blanchard, 2008. "The State of Macro," NBER Working Papers 14259, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Bennett T. McCallum & Edward Nelson, 1997. "An Optimizing IS-LM Specification for Monetary Policy and Business Cycle Analysis," NBER Working Papers 5875, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Laidler, David, 2006. "Woodford and Wicksell on Interest and Prices: The Place of the Pure Credit Economy in the Theory of Monetary Policy," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 28(02), pages 151-159, June.
    5. Michael Woodford, 2001. "The Taylor Rule and Optimal Monetary Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 232-237, May.
    6. Buiter, Willem, 2009. "The unfortunate uselessness of most ’state of the art’ academic monetary economics," MPRA Paper 58407, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 06 Mar 2009.
    7. John B. Taylor, 2000. "Teaching Modern Macroeconomics at the Principles Level," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 90-94, May.
    8. Robert G. King, 1993. "Will the New Keynesian Macroeconomics Resurrect the IS-LM Model?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 67-82, Winter.
    9. Willem H. Buiter, 1990. "Principles of Budgetary and Financial Policy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262524139, June.
    10. James Tobin & Willem H. Buiter, 1974. "Long Run Effects of Fiscal and Monetary Policy on Aggregate Demand," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 384, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
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