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Interaction Effects in Probit Models, Reinterpreting the Impact of Education on Attitudes towards Immigrants and Free-Trade

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  • Natalia Melgar

    (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República.)

Abstract

Economic literature has examined the impact of education and factors endowment on individual preferences towards free-trade and immigration by focusing on the sign of an interaction term between the educational level and the Gross Domestic Product per capita. The aim of this paper is to re-examine this issue by employing the new method proposed Ai and Norton (2003). Findings showed that attitudes are not fully in line with theHeckscher-Ohlin model. That is, high educated people in richer countries could be against immigration and free-trade if their overall disposition to these issues is bad.

Suggested Citation

  • Natalia Melgar, 2013. "Interaction Effects in Probit Models, Reinterpreting the Impact of Education on Attitudes towards Immigrants and Free-Trade," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1013, Department of Economics - dECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:1013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anna Maria Mayda, 2006. "Who Is Against Immigration? A Cross-Country Investigation of Individual Attitudes toward Immigrants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(3), pages 510-530, August.
    2. Mayda, Anna Maria, 2008. "Why are people more pro-trade than pro-migration?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 160-163, December.
    3. Scheve, Kenneth F. & Slaughter, Matthew J., 2001. "What determines individual trade-policy preferences?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 267-292, August.
    4. Mayda, Anna Maria & Rodrik, Dani, 2005. "Why are some people (and countries) more protectionist than others?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1393-1430, August.
    5. Giovanni Facchini & Anna Maria Mayda, 2009. "Does the Welfare State Affect Individual Attitudes toward Immigrants? Evidence across Countries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(2), pages 295-314, May.
    6. Alan E. Kessler & Gary P. Freeman, 2005. "Public Opinion in the EU on Immigration from Outside the Community," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(4), pages 825-850, November.
    7. Ai, Chunrong & Norton, Edward C., 2003. "Interaction terms in logit and probit models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 123-129, July.
    8. Edward C. Norton & Hua Wang & Chunrong Ai, 2004. "Computing interaction effects and standard errors in logit and probit models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(2), pages 154-167, June.
    9. Hainmueller, Jens & Hiscox, Michael J., 2007. "Educated Preferences: Explaining Attitudes Toward Immigration in Europe," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(2), pages 399-442, April.
    10. O'Rourke, Kevin H. & Sinnott, Richard, 2006. "The determinants of individual attitudes towards immigration," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 838-861, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration; free-trade; globalization; cross-country research; probit models;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade

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