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Sharing Personal Information with Close and Distant Peers

Author

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  • Simeon Schudy
  • Verena Utikal

Abstract

We provide evidence that people have preferences for data privacy and show that these preferences partly reflect people’s interest in controlling who receives their private information. Participants of an experiment face the decision to share validated personal information with peers. We compare preferences for sharing potentially embarrassing information (body weight and height) and non-embarrassing information (address data) with geographically proximate or distant peers. We find that i) participants are willing to give up substantial monetary amounts in order to keep both types of information private, ii) data types are valued differently, and iii) prices for potentially embarrassing information tend to be higher for geographically proximate than distant peers.

Suggested Citation

  • Simeon Schudy & Verena Utikal, 2014. "Sharing Personal Information with Close and Distant Peers," TWI Research Paper Series 91, Thurgauer Wirtschaftsinstitut, Universität Konstanz.
  • Handle: RePEc:twi:respas:0091
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    File URL: https://www.twi-kreuzlingen.ch/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/twi-rps-091-schudy-utikal.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Beresford, Alastair R. & Kübler, Dorothea & Preibusch, Sören, 2012. "Unwillingness to pay for privacy: A field experiment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 25-27.
    2. Greiner, Ben, 2004. "An Online Recruitment System for Economic Experiments," MPRA Paper 13513, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Alessandro Acquisti & Leslie K. John & George Loewenstein, 2013. "What Is Privacy Worth?," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(2), pages 249-274.
    4. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Huck, Steffen & Weizsäcker, Georg, 2015. "Markets for leaked information," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2015-305, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    preferences; data privacy; information transmission; experiment;

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