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National Data Sets: Sources of Information for Canadian Child Care Data

  • Forer, Barry
  • Kohen, Dafna
  • Hertzman, Clyde
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    The present review provides a description of various Canadian national survey data sets that could be used to examine issues related to child care use. National data sets dealing with patterns of employment, time use, family earnings, social support, and child, adolescent, or adult health measures were included. We conclude that numerous questions remain unanswered in terms of addressing the relationship between patterns of employment, use of child care, family roles and responsibilities, and associations with the health of families. Recommendations are made about information that has not been collected but may prove to be useful in addressing these issues. Moreover, we conclude that existing Canadian national survey data could be used to address several issues related to patterns of care use as well as the impact on children and families.

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    File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11F0019M2006284&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
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    Paper provided by Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch in its series Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series with number 2006284e.

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    Date of creation: 19 Jun 2006
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    Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2006284e
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6
    Web page: http://www.statcan.gc.ca

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    1. Shelley Phipps & Peter Burton & Lars Osberg, 2001. "Time as a Source of Inequality Within Marriage: Are Husbands More Satisfied With Time for Themselves than Wives?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 1-21.
    2. Pierre Lefebvre & Philip Merrigan, 2000. "The Effect of Childcare and Early Education Arrangements on Developmental Outcomes of Young Children," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 119, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
    3. Shelley Phipps & Peter Burton & Lynn Lethbridge, 2001. "In and out of the labour market: long-term income consequences of child-related interruptions to women's paid work," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 411-429, May.
    4. Richard P. Chaykowski & Lisa M. Powell, 1999. "Women and the Labour Market: Recent Trends and Policy Issues," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 25(s1), pages 2-25, November.
    5. Gordon Cleveland & Morley Gunderson & Douglas Hyatt, 1996. "Child Care Costs and the Employment Decision of Women: Canadian Evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 29(1), pages 132-51, February.
    6. Lisa M. Powell, 1997. "The Impact of Child Care Cost on the Labour Supply of Married Mothers: Evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(3), pages 577-94, August.
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