IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/spo/wpmain/infohdl2441-1gt6nhe6vs8pbb86oi81bt6838.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Border adjustment mechanisms : Elements for economic, legal, and political analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Julien Bueb

    (Centre d’analyse, de prévision et de stratégie (CAPS))

  • Lilian Richieri Hanania

    (Centre for Studies on Society and Technology (CEST))

  • Alice Leclezio

    (Centre de recherches internationales)

Abstract

This paper examines, from a multidisciplinary perspective, plausible hypotheses for implementation of border carbon adjustment mechanisms, seen as a complement to strong environmental regulation. It highlights economic, legal, and political difficulties raised by border carbon adjustments. After thoroughly reviewing their economic practicability, it analyses these mechanisms from an International Trade Law perspective, particularly vis-à-vis the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, sustainable development, and the principle of shared but differentiated responsibilities. It concludes with an assessment of policy-related implications of such mechanisms and outlines, in particular, how border carbon adjustments may be used as an engine of economic and energy transition, for developed and developing countries equally.

Suggested Citation

  • Julien Bueb & Lilian Richieri Hanania & Alice Leclezio, 2016. "Border adjustment mechanisms : Elements for economic, legal, and political analysis," Sciences Po publications 2016/20, Sciences Po.
  • Handle: RePEc:spo:wpmain:info:hdl:2441/1gt6nhe6vs8pbb86oi81bt6838
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://spire.sciencespo.fr/hdl:/2441/1gt6nhe6vs8pbb86oi81bt6838/resources/2017-04-le-clezio-wider-wp2016-20.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. ZhongXiang Zhang, 2012. "Climate Change Meets Trade in Promoting Green Growth: Potential Conflicts and Synergies," Chapters,in: Responding to Climate Change, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Böhringer, Christoph & Balistreri, Edward J. & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2012. "The role of border carbon adjustment in unilateral climate policy: Overview of an Energy Modeling Forum study (EMF 29)," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S2), pages 97-110.
    3. repec:dau:papers:123456789/7348 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Damien Demailly & Philippe Quirion, 2008. "Concilier compétitivité industrielle et politique climatique. Faut-il distribuer les quotas de CO2 en fonction de la production ou bien les ajuster aux frontières ?," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 59(3), pages 497-504.
    5. Monjon, Stéphanie & Quirion, Philippe, 2010. "How to design a border adjustment for the European Union Emissions Trading System?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 5199-5207, September.
    6. Odile Blanchard & Patrick Criqui & Alban Kitous & Silvana Mima, 2006. "The impact of climate policies on energy markets and the price of carbon," Revue d'Économie Financière, Programme National Persée, vol. 83(2), pages 89-110.
    7. Markusen, James R., 1975. "International externalities and optimal tax structures," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 15-29, February.
    8. Trevor Houser & Rob Bradley & Britt Childs, 2008. "Leveling the Carbon Playing Field: International Competition and US Climate Policy Design," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 4204.
    9. Jeffrey J. Schott & Meera Fickling, 2010. "Revisiting the NAFTA Agenda on Climate Change," Policy Briefs PB10-19, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    10. Frédéric Branger, Philippe Quirion, Julien Chevallier, 2017. "Carbon Leakage and Competitiveness of Cement and Steel Industries Under the EU ETS: Much Ado About Nothing," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    11. Steve Rayner, 2010. "How to eat an elephant: a bottom-up approach to climate policy," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(6), pages 615-621, November.
    12. Stiglitz Joseph, 2006. "A New Agenda for Global Warming," The Economists' Voice, De Gruyter, vol. 3(7), pages 1-4, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:appene:v:201:y:2017:i:c:p:188-199 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    environmental regulation; border carbon adjustment; international trade law; General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade; sustainable development; political economy;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spo:wpmain:info:hdl:2441/1gt6nhe6vs8pbb86oi81bt6838. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Spire @ Sciences Po Library). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ecspofr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.