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Growth and Social Security: The Role of Human Capital

Author

Listed:
  • Alexander Kemnitz

    (University of Mannheim)

  • Berthold U. Wigger

    (University of Mannheim and CSEF, University of Salerno)

Abstract

This paper studies the growth and efficiency effects of pay-as-you-go financed social security when human capital is the engine of growth. Employing a variant of the Lucas (1988) model with overlapping generations, it is shown that a properly designed unfunded social security system leads to higher output growth than a fully funded one. Furthermore, the economy with unfunded social security is efficient while the other one is not. These results stand in sharp contrast to those that obtain in models where economic growth is driven by physical capital accumulation.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander Kemnitz & Berthold U. Wigger, 2000. "Growth and Social Security: The Role of Human Capital," CSEF Working Papers 33, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:sef:csefwp:33
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
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    3. Gilles Saint-Paul, 1992. "Fiscal Policy in an Endogenous Growth Model," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, President and Fellows of Harvard College, vol. 107(4), pages 1243-1259.
    4. Freeman, Scott & Polasky, Stephen, 1992. "Knowledge-based growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 3-24, October.
    5. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 2004. "The pay-as-you-go pension system as fertility insurance and an enforcement device," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1335-1357, July.
    6. Costas Azariadis & Allan Drazen, 1990. "Threshold Externalities in Economic Development," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, President and Fellows of Harvard College, vol. 105(2), pages 501-526.
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    8. Robert C. Merton, 1983. "On the Role of Social Security as a Means for Efficient Risk Sharing in an Economy Where Human Capital Is Not Tradable," NBER Chapters, in: Financial Aspects of the United States Pension System, pages 325-358, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Endogenous Growth; Social Security; Human Capital;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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