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Costs and Benefits of Labour Mobility between the EU and the Eastern Partnership Partner Countries. Country report: Georgia


  • Lasha Labadze
  • Mirian Tukhashvili


This study provides an analysis of the costs and benefits of emigration for Georgia, with an emphasis on emigration to the EU. In the concluding section we dwell on the consequences of a possible liberalization of EU migration policies with regard to Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries, and how such a policy change would affect the flow and composition of migration from Georgia to the EU. The study estimates the costs and benefits of migration through the prism of recent economics developments in Georgia and in particular the sweeping liberalization reforms of recent years. While Georgia remains a poor country, its geopolitical position as a Western outpost in the Caucasus and Central Asian region, its role as a key trade and transportation hub, the superior quality of its bureaucracy, lack of corruption, etc., provide a very different context for migration processes, turning migration into a circular phenomenon, a major factor in modernizing the Georgian economy, society, and politics. The EU should give due consideration to this phenomenon as it (re)considers its policy on migration with regard to Georgia and, potentially, other EaP countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Lasha Labadze & Mirian Tukhashvili, 2013. "Costs and Benefits of Labour Mobility between the EU and the Eastern Partnership Partner Countries. Country report: Georgia," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0463, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:sec:cnstan:0463

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Yaroslava Babych & Michael Fuenfzig, 2012. "An Application of the Growth Diagnostics Framework: The Case of Georgia," Working Papers 001-12, International School of Economics at TSU, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maya Grigolia & Lasha Labadze & Pavol Minarik & Alena Zemplinerova & Marek Vokoun, 2015. "Transfer of Know-how for SMEs in Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. White Paper: Georgia," CASE Network Reports 0123, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Cebotari, Victor & Siegel, Melissa & Mazzucato, Valentina, 2016. "Migration and the education of children who stay behind in Moldova and Georgia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 96-107.

    More about this item


    Labour Economics; Labour Markets; Labour Mobility; Georgia;

    JEL classification:

    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J40 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - General
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J83 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Workers' Rights

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