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Birth Order Effects on Educational Attainment and Child Labour: Evidence from Lesotho

Author

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  • Ramaele Moshoeshoe

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of birth order on educational attainment and child labour in Lesotho. Using family fixed effects models, I find robust negative birth order effects on educational attainment and child labour. The birth order effects on educational attainment are in sharp contrast with the evidence from many other developing countries such as Ecuador and Kenya, but are consistent with the evidence from developed countries. I further find that these birth order effects are pronounced in large families, and families with first-born girls, which suggests presence of girls' education bias. Turning to potential pathways of these effects, I find that they are not propagated through family wealth, but mainly through birth-spacing. These results are robust to different sample restrictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ramaele Moshoeshoe, 2016. "Birth Order Effects on Educational Attainment and Child Labour: Evidence from Lesotho," Working Papers 621, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:621
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    File URL: https://www.econrsa.org/node/1254
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    Cited by:

    1. Fredrick M. Wamalwa & Justine Burns, 2017. "Gender and Birth Order Effects on Intra-household Schooling Choices and Education Attainments in Kenya," Working Papers 708, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    2. Maximilian Schwefer, 2018. "Birth Order Effects and Educational Achievement in the Developing World," ifo Working Paper Series 282, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Educational attainment; Child labour; Birth Order;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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