IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/rut/rutres/200406.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Taxpayer Responses to Competitive Tax Policies and Tax Policy Responses to Competitive Taxpayers: Recent Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Rosanne Altshuler

    () (Rutgers University, Department of Economics)

  • Harry Grubert

    () (U.S. Treasury Department, Office of Tax Analysis)

Abstract

We use information from the tax returns of U.S. multinational corporations to address three questions related to tax competition. First, does tax competition or company tax planning behavior better explain recent decreases in the local effective tax rates faced by U.S. multinationals investing abroad? Second, have countries become more aggressive in their use of tax concessions to attract particular types of foreign capital? And finally, has the role of taxes in the location decisions of U.S. manufacturers increased in recent years? Between 1992 and 2000, the average effective tax rate faced by U.S. manufacturers on income earned abroad fell from 25 percent to 21 percent. Our results suggest that the evolution of country effective tax rates between 1992 and 1998 seems to be driven by tax competition. Countries that lost shares of U.S. manufacturing real capital prior to 1992 cut their rates the most over this period. However, the most recent data suggests that companies may not need tax competition to lower effective tax burdens abroad. The evolution of country effective rates between 1998 and 2000 seems to be driven by company rather than country behavior. This is consistent with the introduction of the “check the box” regulations in 1997 which made it easier for corporations to use “self-help” to lower tax burdens. Interestingly, we find that countries were rewarding more mobile companies and those that were perceived to be more beneficial to the local economy with tax concessions as far back as 1984. Finally, although not conclusive, our empirical work suggests that U.S. manufacturers may have become more sensitive to differences in local tax rates across countries in recent years.Length: 20 pages

Suggested Citation

  • Rosanne Altshuler & Harry Grubert, 2004. "Taxpayer Responses to Competitive Tax Policies and Tax Policy Responses to Competitive Taxpayers: Recent Evidence," Departmental Working Papers 200406, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:rut:rutres:200406
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sas.rutgers.edu/virtual/snde/wp/2004-06.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rosanne Altshuler & Timothy J. Goodspeed, 2015. "Follow the Leader? Evidence on European and US Tax Competition," Public Finance Review, , vol. 43(4), pages 485-504, July.
    2. Harry Grubert, 2003. "The Tax Burden on Cross-Border Investment: Company Strategies and Country Responses," CESifo Working Paper Series 964, CESifo Group Munich.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Laura Kawano & Joel Slemrod, 2012. "The Effect of Tax Rates and Tax Bases on Corporate Tax Revenues: Estimates with New Measures of the Corporate Tax Base," NBER Working Papers 18440, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Rosanne Altshuler & Harry Grubert, 2005. "The Three Parties in the Race to the Bottom: Host Governments, Home Governments and Multinational Companies," CESifo Working Paper Series 1613, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Desai, Mihir A. & Dharmapala, Dhammika, 2009. "Taxes, institutions and foreign diversification opportunities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(5-6), pages 703-714, June.
    4. Hristu-Varsakelis, Dimitrios & Karagianni, Stella & Saraidaris, Anastasios, 2011. "Equilibrium conditions in corporate tax competition and Foreign Direct Investment flows," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 13-21, January.
    5. John W. Diamond & George R. Zodrow & Thomas S. Neubig & Robert J. Carroll, 2014. "The Dynamic Economic Effects of a US Corporate Income Tax Rate Reduction," Working Papers 1405, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
    6. James R. Hines Jr., 2005. "Do Tax Havens Flourish?," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 19, pages 65-100 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Liu, Li & Altshuler, Rosanne, 2013. "Measuring the Burden of the Corporate Income Tax Under Imperfect Competition," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 66(1), pages 215-237, March.
    8. James R. Hines Jr. & Lawrence H. Summers, 2009. "How Globalization Affects Tax Design," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 23, pages 123-157 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Laura Kawano & Joel Slemrod, 2016. "How do corporate tax bases change when corporate tax rates change? With implications for the tax rate elasticity of corporate tax revenues," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(3), pages 401-433, June.
    10. Dharmapala, Dhammika & Hines Jr., James R., 2009. "Which countries become tax havens?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(9-10), pages 1058-1068, October.
    11. Hristu-Varsakelis, Dimitrios & Karagianni, Stella & Saraidaris, Anastasios, 2011. "Equilibrium conditions in corporate tax competition and Foreign Direct Investment flows," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 13-21.
    12. Krishanu Karmakar & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2014. "Fiscal Competition versus Fiscal Harmonization: A Review of the Arguments," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1431, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    13. Zodrow, George R., 2010. "Capital Mobility and Capital Tax Competition," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 63(4), pages 865-901, December.
    14. Rosanne Altshuler, 2010. "Lessons from the Study of Taxes and the Behaviour of US Multinational Corporations," Chapters,in: Tax Reform in Open Economies, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    tax competition; multinational corporations; effective tax rates; international taxation;

    JEL classification:

    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • H87 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - International Fiscal Issues; International Public Goods

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rut:rutres:200406. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/derutus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.