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International Sports League Comparisons

Author

Listed:
  • Helmut Dietl

    () (Institute for Strategy and Business Economics, University of Zurich)

  • Rodney Fort

    () (Institute for Strategy and Business Economics, University of Zurich)

  • Markus Lang

    () (Sport Management, University of Michigan)

Abstract

Comparisons between European and North American sports leagues have occurred over the years. In this paper, we attempt to bring these comparisons down to the essential elements -what has come to be called Rottenberg's (1956) invariance principle and theoretical insights into attempts to alter competitive balance using revenue sharing, talent drafts, and payroll caps. We also examine player reserve systems (the reserve clause in North American leagues and transfer restrictions in European leagues) and differences in objective functions (North American leagues are treated under profit maximization while European leagues are treated under utility maximization and win maximization). The focus is on model predictions compared to actual outcomes, and any differences between North America and Europe.

Suggested Citation

  • Helmut Dietl & Rodney Fort & Markus Lang, 2011. "International Sports League Comparisons," Working Papers 0042, University of Zurich, Center for Research in Sports Administration (CRSA).
  • Handle: RePEc:rsd:wpaper:0042
    as

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    File URL: http://repec.business.uzh.ch/RePEc/rsd/CRSA_WPS/42_CRSA_full.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Markus Lang & Martin Grossmann & Philipp Theiler, 2011. "The Sugar Daddy Game: How Wealthy Investors Change Competition in Professional Team Sports," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 167(4), pages 557-577, December.
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    3. Fort, Rodney, 2000. "European and North American Sports Differences(?)," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 47(4), pages 431-455, September.
    4. Helmut M. Dietl & Egon Franck & Markus Lang, 2008. "Overinvestment In Team Sports Leagues: A Contest Theory Model," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 55(3), pages 353-368, July.
    5. Daniel Rascher, 1997. "A model of a professional sports league," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 3(3), pages 327-328, August.
    6. Helmut M. Dietl & Egon Franck & Markus Lang & Alexander Rathke, 2012. "Salary Cap Regulation In Professional Team Sports," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 30(3), pages 307-319, July.
    7. Dietl, Helmut M. & Franck, Egon & Hasan, Tariq & Lang, Markus, 2009. "Governance of professional sports leagues--Cooperatives versus contracts," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 127-137, June.
    8. John Goddard & Peter J. Sloane, 2005. "Economics of sport," Chapters,in: Economics Uncut, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Rodney Fort & Jason Winfree, 2009. "Sports Really are Different: The Contest Success Function and the Supply of Talent," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 34(1), pages 69-80, February.
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    11. Helmut M. Dietl & Markus Lang & Alexander Rathke, 2011. "The Combined Effect Of Salary Restrictions And Revenue Sharing In Sports Leagues," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(2), pages 447-463, April.
    12. Stergios Skaperdas, 1996. "Contest success functions (*)," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 7(2), pages 283-290.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sports league; invariance principle; revenue sharing; talent draft; payroll cap;

    JEL classification:

    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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