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Macroprudential and Monetary Policies Interactions in a DSGE Model for Sweden

Author

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  • Francesco Columba

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Jaqian Chen

    (IMF)

Abstract

We analyse the effects and the interactions of macroprudential and monetary policies with an estimated dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model tailored to Sweden. Households are constrained by a loan-to-value ratio and mortgages are amortized. Government grants mortgage interest payment deductions. Lending rates are affected by mortgage risk weights. We find that to curb the household debt-to-income ratio demand-side macroprudential measures are more effective and less costly in terms of foregone consumption than monetary policy. A tighter macroprudential stance is also welfare improving, by promoting lower consumption volatility in response to shock, especially when combining different instruments, whose sequence of implementation is key.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Columba & Jaqian Chen, 2016. "Macroprudential and Monetary Policies Interactions in a DSGE Model for Sweden," 2016 Meeting Papers 913, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed016:913
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Grégory LEVIEUGE & Jose David GARCIA REVELO, 2020. "When could macroprudential and monetary policies be in conflict?," LEO Working Papers / DR LEO 2749, Orleans Economics Laboratory / Laboratoire d'Economie d'Orleans (LEO), University of Orleans.
    2. Anna Grodecka, 2020. "On the Effectiveness of Loan‐to‐Value Regulation in a Multiconstraint Framework," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 52(5), pages 1231-1270, August.

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