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Is Dynamic Competition Socially Beneficial? The Case of Price as Investment

Author

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  • Yaroslav Kryukov

    (Carnegie-Mellon University)

  • Ulrich Doraszelski

    (University of Pennsylvania)

  • David Besanko

    (Northwestern University)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Yaroslav Kryukov & Ulrich Doraszelski & David Besanko, 2015. "Is Dynamic Competition Socially Beneficial? The Case of Price as Investment," 2015 Meeting Papers 296, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:296
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2015/paper_296.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1977. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 297-308, June.
    2. Richard Ericson & Ariel Pakes, 1995. "Markov-Perfect Industry Dynamics: A Framework for Empirical Work," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(1), pages 53-82.
    3. Luís Cabral, 2011. "Dynamic Price Competition with Network Effects," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 78(1), pages 83-111.
    4. Jiawei Chen & Ulrich Doraszelski & Joseph E. Harrington, Jr., 2009. "Avoiding market dominance: product compatibility in markets with network effects," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 40(3), pages 455-485.
    5. Jean-Pierre H. Dubé & Günter J. Hitsch & Pradeep K. Chintagunta, 2010. "Tipping and Concentration in Markets with Indirect Network Effects," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 29(2), pages 216-249, 03-04.
    6. Ilya Segal & Michael D. Whinston, 2007. "Antitrust in Innovative Industries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(5), pages 1703-1730, December.
    7. Cabral, Luis M B & Riordan, Michael H, 1994. "The Learning Curve, Market Dominance, and Predatory Pricing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, pages 1115-1140.
    8. Farrell, Joseph & Klemperer, Paul, 2007. "Coordination and Lock-In: Competition with Switching Costs and Network Effects," Handbook of Industrial Organization, Elsevier.
    9. Roger W. Koenker & Martin K. Perry, 1981. "Product Differentiation, Monopolistic Competition, and Public Policy," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 12(1), pages 217-231, Spring.
    10. Besanko, David & Perry, Martin K & Spady, Richard H, 1990. "The Logit Model of Monopolistic Competition: Brand Diversity," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(4), pages 397-415, June.
    11. Bergemann, Dirk & Valimaki, Juuso, 2006. "Dynamic price competition," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 127(1), pages 232-263, March.
    12. Dasgupta, Partha & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1988. "Learning-by-Doing, Market Structure and Industrial and Trade Policies," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 246-268, June.
    13. Drew Fudenberg & Jean Tirole, 1983. "Learning-by-Doing and Market Performance," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 14(2), pages 522-530, Autumn.
    14. Jean Tirole, 1988. "The Theory of Industrial Organization," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262200716, January.
    15. Christopher Budd & Christopher Harris & John Vickers, 1993. "A Model of the Evolution of Duopoly: Does the Asymmetry between Firms Tend to Increase or Decrease?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 543-573.
    16. Posner, Richard A, 1975. "The Social Costs of Monopoly and Regulation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(4), pages 807-827, August.
    17. David Besanko & Ulrich Doraszelski & Yaroslav Kryukov, 2014. "The Economics of Predation: What Drives Pricing When There Is Learning-by-Doing?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(3), pages 868-897, March.
    18. David Besanko & Ulrich Doraszelski & Yaroslav Kryukov & Mark Satterthwaite, 2010. "Learning-by-Doing, Organizational Forgetting, and Industry Dynamics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(2), pages 453-508, March.
    19. Bolton, Patrick & Farrell, Joseph, 1990. "Decentralization, Duplication, and Delay," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(4), pages 803-826, August.
    20. Jiawei Chen, 2011. "How do Switching Costs Affect Market Concentration and Prices in Network Industries?," 2011 Meeting Papers 1428, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    21. Matthew Mitchell & Andrzej Skrzypacz, 2006. "Network externalities and long-run market shares," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), pages 621-648.
    22. Cabral, Luis M B & Riordan, Michael H, 1997. "The Learning Curve, Predation, Antitrust, and Welfare," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 155-169, June.
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