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Malthus in Sweden

  • Nils-Petter Lagerlöf

    (York University)

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    rates in 18th- and 19th-century Sweden with a seven-grade scale over harvest outcomes in the county where the parish was located. We find a Malthusian pattern: a good harvest one year leads to lower death rates, and higher birth and marriage rates, in particular the following year; for death rates there is also an effect in the same year. The effects are large. For example, a crop failure raises the death rate by 15%, and lowers birth and marriage rates by about 10%, in the following year.

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    File URL: https://www.economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2010/paper_790.pdf
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    Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2010 Meeting Papers with number 790.

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    Date of creation: 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:790
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    1. Cervellati, Matteo & Sunde, Uwe, 2005. "Human capital formation, life expectancy, and the process of development," Munich Reprints in Economics 20083, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    2. Schultz, T Paul, 1985. "Changing World Prices, Women's Wages, and the Fertility Transition: Sweden, 1860-1910," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(6), pages 1126-54, December.
    3. Charles I. Jones, . "Was an Industrial Revolution Inevitable? Economic Growth Over the Very Long Run," Working Papers 99008, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    4. Tamura, Robert, 1996. "From decay to growth: A demographic transition to economic growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(6-7), pages 1237-1261.
    5. Nils-Petter Lagerlöf, 2003. "From Malthus to Modern Growth: Can Epidemics Explain the Three Regimes?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(2), pages 755-777, 05.
    6. David de la Croix & Thomas Lindh & Bo Malmberg, 2008. "Swedish economic growth and education since 1800," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 41(1), pages 166-185, February.
    7. Nicolini, Esteban A., 2007. "Was Malthus right? A VAR analysis of economic and demographic interactions in pre-industrial England," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(01), pages 99-121, April.
    8. Michael Bar & Oksana Leukhina, 2009. "Supplemental Notes to "Demographic transition and industrial revolution: A macroeconomic investigation"," Technical Appendices 08-85, Review of Economic Dynamics.
    9. Michael Anderson & Ronald Lee, 2002. "Malthus in state space: Macro economic-demographic relations in English history, 1540 to 1870," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 195-220.
    10. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2000. "Natural Selection and the Origin of economic Growth," Working Papers 2000-18, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    11. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
    12. Tamura, Robert, 2002. "Human capital and the switch from agriculture to industry," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 207-242, December.
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