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Backslanted X Fertility Dynamics and Macroeconomics

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  • Yishay D. Maoz

    () (Israel University of Haifa)

Abstract

A large number of pairs of countries exhibit a dynamic pattern in which: (i) Fertility in both countries declines across time; (ii) Initially one country has higher fertility and lower per-capita income compared to the other; (iii) In time, as per-capita income converges, fertility rates in the poorer country become lower than in the richer one. This paper provides statistics on the prevalence of such dynamics and a theoretical model in which these dynamics emerge endogenously. Assuming that countries differ in the degree of utility substitution between consumption and rearing children is sufficient to generate all three components of these dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Yishay D. Maoz, 2006. "Backslanted X Fertility Dynamics and Macroeconomics," 2006 Meeting Papers 291, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed006:291
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Human Capital; Economic Growth;

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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