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The Technological Structure and Performance of Developing Country Manufactured Exports, 1985-1998

  • Sanjaya Lall

This paper maps recent manufactured export patterns in developing countries, using a new and detailed classification by technology. It argues that export structures, being path-dependent and difficult to change, have implications for growth and development. Low technology products tend to grow the slowest and technology intensive products the fastest. East Asia dominates the scene with 70 percent of developing-world manufactured exports; there is high and rising concentration at the national level. The strategies used to achieve competitiveness differ greatly between countries. Received trade theory cannot explain these patterns without considering learning processes and the policies used to promote them.

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File URL: http://www3.qeh.ox.ac.uk/RePEc/qeh/qehwps/qehwps44.pdf
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Paper provided by Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford in its series QEH Working Papers with number qehwps44.

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Handle: RePEc:qeh:qehwps:qehwps44
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  1. Jose Miguel Benavente & Gustavo Crespi & Jorge Katz & Giovanni Stumpo, 1997. "New problems and opportunities for industrial development in Latin America," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 261-277.
  2. Fagerberg, Jan, 1996. "Technology and Competitiveness," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(3), pages 39-51, Autumn.
  3. Gereffi, Gary, 1999. "International trade and industrial upgrading in the apparel commodity chain," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 37-70, June.
  4. Lall, Sanjaya & Teubal, Morris, 1998. ""Market-stimulating" technology policies in developing countries: A framework with examples from East Asia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(8), pages 1369-1385, August.
  5. Redding, S., 1997. "Dynamic Comparative Advantage and the Welfare Effects of Trade," Economics Papers 140, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  6. Lall, Sanjaya, 1999. "India's Manufactured Exports: Comparative Structure and Prospects," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(10), pages 1769-1786, October.
  7. Venables, Anthony J., 1996. "Trade policy, cumulative causation, and industrial development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 179-197, April.
  8. Nancy L. Stokey, 1990. "Human Capital, Product Quality, and Growth," Discussion Papers 883, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  9. Lall, Sanjaya, 1998. "Exports of Manufactures by Developing Countries: Emerging Patterns of Trade and Location," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 54-73, Summer.
  10. Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1996. "Some Lessons from the East Asian Miracle," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 11(2), pages 151-77, August.
  11. Pavitt, Keith, 1984. "Sectoral patterns of technical change: Towards a taxonomy and a theory," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 343-373, December.
  12. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," NBER Working Papers 3577, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Wood, Adrian, 1995. "North-South Trade, Employment and Inequality: Changing Fortunes in a Skill-Driven World," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198290155, March.
  14. Rodrik, Dani, 1996. "Coordination failures and government policy: A model with applications to East Asia and Eastern Europe," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1-2), pages 1-22, February.
  15. Young, Alwyn, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(2), pages 369-405, May.
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