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Social Trust Formation in the Workplace: Applying the Job Strain Model to Explain Variations in Social Trust Levels among Employed Individuals

Author

Listed:
  • Tamilina, Larysa
  • Tamilina, Natalya

Abstract

This study applies the job strain model (JDC-S) to social trust to analyze how workplace characteristics influence social trust formation patterns. By defining the “workplace” as consisting of (1) workload, (2) control, and (3) social support, the JDC-S model predicts job demands to inversely relate to social trust, whereas job control and social support to positively affect trust among the employed. We utilize the sample of 60250 respondents from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) to operationalize the three components and link them to social trust scores. Our analysis provides strong empirical evidence that the three factors are not only associated with trust among employed individuals but that their impact is also contingent on the respondents’ sex and age.

Suggested Citation

  • Tamilina, Larysa & Tamilina, Natalya, 2019. "Social Trust Formation in the Workplace: Applying the Job Strain Model to Explain Variations in Social Trust Levels among Employed Individuals," MPRA Paper 96708, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:96708
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/96708/1/MPRA_paper_96708.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Lynch & George Smith & Marianne Hillemeier & Trivellore Raghunathan & George Kaplan & Mary Shaw, 2001. "Income Inequality, the Psycho-social Environment and Health Comparisons of Wealthy Nations," LIS Working papers 269, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    2. Ben-Ner, Avner & Halldorsson, Freyr, 2010. "Trusting and trustworthiness: What are they, how to measure them, and what affects them," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 64-79, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    social trust; job strain model; job characteristics; workplace properties; multilevel analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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