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Liquidity Backup from Commercial Banks to Shadow Banks

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  • Zhou, Zhongzheng

Abstract

During the Great Recession, liquidity did not flow out of the banking sector but transferred internally. Deposits increased, but the volumes of all other short-term debt financing instruments except for T-Bills decreased. Commercial banks, which have stable funding sources from deposits, did not render liquidity backup to shadow banks but held the increased deposits as cash on hand. This paper uses deposits and financial commercial paper outstanding as proxies for commercial and shadow banking financing instruments because they are unique liabilities of commercial and shadow banks, respectively. I provide evidence that when liquidity falls in shadow banks, commercial banks experience funding inflows. In normal times, commercial banks render liquidity backup to shadow banks in the following weeks using the increased deposits. However, the dynamic correlation breaks down in crisis times.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhou, Zhongzheng, 2019. "Liquidity Backup from Commercial Banks to Shadow Banks," MPRA Paper 94713, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:94713
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/94713/1/MPRA_paper_94713.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Allen N. Berger & Christa H. S. Bouwman, 2009. "Bank Liquidity Creation," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(9), pages 3779-3837, September.
    2. Evan Gatev & Philip E. Strahan, 2006. "Banks' Advantage in Hedging Liquidity Risk: Theory and Evidence from the Commercial Paper Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(2), pages 867-892, April.
    3. Acharya, Viral V. & Schnabl, Philipp & Suarez, Gustavo, 2013. "Securitization without risk transfer," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(3), pages 515-536.
    4. James Harvey & Kenneth Spong, 2001. "The decline in core deposits : what can banks do?," Financial Industry Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Dec, pages 35-48.
    5. Gorton, Gary & Metrick, Andrew, 2012. "Securitized banking and the run on repo," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 425-451.
    6. Adam Copeland & Antoine Martin & Michael Walker, 2014. "Repo Runs: Evidence from the Tri-Party Repo Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(6), pages 2343-2380, December.
    7. Marcin Kacperczyk & Philipp Schnabl, 2010. "When Safe Proved Risky: Commercial Paper during the Financial Crisis of 2007-2009," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 29-50, Winter.
    8. Anil K. Kashyap & Raghuram Rajan & Jeremy C. Stein, 2002. "Banks as Liquidity Providers: An Explanation for the Coexistence of Lending and Deposit-Taking," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(1), pages 33-73, February.
    9. Cornett, Marcia Millon & McNutt, Jamie John & Strahan, Philip E. & Tehranian, Hassan, 2011. "Liquidity risk management and credit supply in the financial crisis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(2), pages 297-312, August.
    10. repec:bla:jfinan:v:73:y:2018:i:1:p:51-93 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Arvind Krishnamurthy & Jennie Bai & Charles-Henri Weymuller, 2016. "Measuring Liquidity Mismatch in the Banking Sector," NBER Working Papers 22729, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Shadow Banking; Deposit; Commercial Paper; Liquidity; Crisis;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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