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Successes and Drawbacks of the Federal Reserve and the Impact on Financial Markets

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  • Rashid, Muhammad Mustafa

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to provide an outline of the success and draw backs of the Federal Reserve and the consequent impact on financial markets. A review of the relevant literature from Hubbard (2008) and Dowd & Hutchinson (2010) will provide insights into the success and failures of the Federal Reserve and the impact on financial markets. Further insights will be drawn from; Gorton & Metrick (2013) and their interpretation of the Federal Reserve’s actions since its formation, Romer & Romer (2013) on the pessimism of monetary policy and Dyugen-Bump (et. al 2013) on their assessment of the effectiveness of emergency liquidity measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Rashid, Muhammad Mustafa, 2018. "Successes and Drawbacks of the Federal Reserve and the Impact on Financial Markets," MPRA Paper 89405, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:89405
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 2013. "The Most Dangerous Idea in Federal Reserve History: Monetary Policy Doesn't Matter," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 55-60, May.
    2. Burcu Duygan-Bump & Patrick Parkinson & Eric Rosengren & Gustavo A. Suarez & Paul Willen, 2013. "How Effective Were the Federal Reserve Emergency Liquidity Facilities? Evidence from the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 68(2), pages 715-737, April.
    3. Gary Gorton & Andrew Metrick, 2013. "The Federal Reserve and Panic Prevention: The Roles of Financial Regulation and Lender of Last Resort," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(4), pages 45-64, Fall.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rashid, Muhammad Mustafa, 2019. "A Survey of US and International Financial Regulation Architecture," MPRA Paper 93447, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Rashid, Muhammad Mustafa, 2020. "Case Analysis: Enron; Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Ethical Accounting as Inferior Goods?," MPRA Paper 98441, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Federal Reserve; Financial Markets; Financial Crises; Financial Regulations;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G0 - Financial Economics - - General
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance
    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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