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Is Privatization Related With Macroeconomic Management? Evidence From Some Selected African Countries

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  • George, Emmanuel
  • Odejimi, Deborah
  • Matthews, Oluwatoyin
  • Ojeaga, Paul

Abstract

Has macroeconomic management succeeded in making privatization promote growth in Africa? What are the probable strategies that should accompany the privatization reform process to promote growth in Africa? To what extent has the privatization process succeeded in attracting foreign direct investment to Africa? The study investigates the relationship between macroeconomic management and privatization. Many African countries have embarked on one form of privatization reform or the other since 1980 as one of the stringent conditions for accessing capital from the IMF and the World Bank. Secondly globalization and the gradually integration of the African economy into the global economy also means that Africa has to strategically develop its domestic market to cushion itself from fluctuations and probable contagion associated with global economic crisis that are always inevitable Stiglitz (2000) and Ojeaga P. (2012). The methods of estimation used are the OLS, linear mixed effects (LME), 2SLS and the GMM method of estimation. It was found that macroeconomic management has the capacity to affect the success of the privatization reform process. It was also found that privatization was not promoting growth in Africa; privatization could promote growth if long run growth strategies are implemented together with the privatization reform process. Privatization was also found not to have the capacity to attract foreign investment to many African countries.

Suggested Citation

  • George, Emmanuel & Odejimi, Deborah & Matthews, Oluwatoyin & Ojeaga, Paul, 2013. "Is Privatization Related With Macroeconomic Management? Evidence From Some Selected African Countries," MPRA Paper 62211, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 04 Aug 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:62211
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/62211/1/MPRA_paper_62211.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Paul I. Ojeaga & Emmanuel O. George & Oluwatoyin Mathew & Adetunji Adekola, 2016. "What does FDI inflow mean for emerging african economies? Measuring the regional effects of FDI in Africa," Computational Methods in Social Sciences (CMSS), "Nicolae Titulescu" University of Bucharest, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 4(1), pages 29-46, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; Political Economy; Game Theory; Macroeconomic Management and Privatization;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development

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