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The Relation between Government Expenditures and Economic Growth in Thailand

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  • Jiranyakul, Komain

Abstract

The notion that more government expenditures can stimulate growth is controversial. The causation between government expenditures and economic growth in Thailand is examined using the Granger causality test. There is no cointegration between government expenditures and economic growth. A unidirectional causality from government expenditures to economic growth exists. However, the causality from economic growth to government expenditures is not observed. Additionally, estimation results from the least square method with lagged variables of economic growth, government expenditures and money supply show the strong positive impact of government spending on economic growth during the period of investigation.

Suggested Citation

  • Jiranyakul, Komain, 2007. "The Relation between Government Expenditures and Economic Growth in Thailand," MPRA Paper 46070, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:46070
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/46070/1/MPRA_paper_46070.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Uchechi Shirley Anaduaka & Vivian Ikwuoma Nnetu & Stephen Ekene Aguegboh & David Iheke Okorie, 2016. "Relative Maxima of the Public Sector: A Comparative Study of Nigeria and Ghana," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 6(11), pages 575-589, November.
    2. Abhijeet, Chandra, 2010. "Does Government Expenditure on Education Promote Economic Growth? An Econometric Analysis," MPRA Paper 25480, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Andreas G. Georgantopoulos & Anastasios D. Tsamis, 2012. "The Interrelationship between Money Supply, Prices and Government Expenditures and Economic Growth: A Causality Analysis for the Case of Cyprus," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 5(3), pages 115-128, December.
    4. Robert Pater & Tomasz Skica, 2014. "The productivity of public and private sector in Poland," Business and Economic Horizons (BEH), Prague Development Center, vol. 10(2), pages 120-137, July.
    5. Slim Mahfoudh & Mohamed Ben Amar, 2015. "The Impact of Economic Policies on Economic Growth in a Group of Arabic Countries: Empirical Verification using Non-Stationary Panel Model," Ovidius University Annals, Economic Sciences Series, Ovidius University of Constantza, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 0(2), pages 131-137, May.
    6. Slim Mahfoudh & Mohamed Ben Amar, 2016. "The Impact of Economic Policies on Economic Growth in a Group of Arabic Countries: Empirical Verification using Non-Stationary Panel Model," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 6(1), pages 186-195, January.
    7. Kucukkale, Yakup & Yamak, Rahmi, 2012. "Cointegration, causality and Wagner’s law with disaggregated data: evidence from Turkey, 1968-2004," MPRA Paper 36894, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Adu Frank & Ohene-Manu Joseph & Ishmael Ackah, 2014. "Government Expenditures and Economic Growth dynamics in Ghana," International Journal of Economics and Empirical Research (IJEER), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 2(5), pages 180-190, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth; Government expenditures; Granger causality test; Least Square Estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • N15 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development

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