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Borrowing Constraints, Multiple Equilibria and Monetary Policy

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  • Assenza, Tiziana

Abstract

The appealing feature of Kiyotaki and Moore's Financial Accelerator model (Kiyotaki and Moore, 1997, 2002) is the linkage of asset price changes and borrowing constraints. This framework therefore is the natural vehicle to explore the net worth channel of the monetary transmission mechanism. In the original model, however, all the variables, credit included, are in real terms. In order to assess the impact of monetary policy the model must be reformulated to fit a monetary economy. In the present paper we model a monetary economy with financing constraints adopting the Money In the Utility function (MIU) approach.The occurrence of multiple equilibria is a likely outcome of the dynamics generated by the model. A change in the growth rate of money supply can affect real out- put through the impact of inflation on net worth. In a sense the monetary transmission mechanism we are focusing on consists of a combination of the inflation tax effect and the net worth channel. Contrary to the traditional view, at least for some parameter restrictions, an increase of the inflation tax can bring about an increase of aggregate output.

Suggested Citation

  • Assenza, Tiziana, 2007. "Borrowing Constraints, Multiple Equilibria and Monetary Policy," MPRA Paper 4049, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:4049
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    1. Matteo Iacoviello, 2005. "House Prices, Borrowing Constraints, and Monetary Policy in the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(3), pages 739-764, June.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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