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How does trade-mediated technology transfer affect interregional and intersectoral competition? Exploring multi-sectoral effects in a global trade model


  • Das, Gouranga


In this paper, all technology transfers are embodied in trade flows within a three-region, six-tradedcommodity version of the GTAP model. 4% Hicks-Neutral technical progress in heavy manufacturing in one region has uneven impacts on productivity elsewhere. Why? Destination regions’ ability to harness new technology depends on their absorptive capacity and on the structural congruence of the source and destination. Together with trade volume, these two factors determine the recipient’s success in capturing foreign technology. Sectors, intensive in heavy manufacturing, register higher productivity growth. Inter-regional competition coupled with changes in price relativities, loom large in general equilibrium adjustment. Hicks-neutrality of the TFP (total factor productivity) improvement implies that, at the initial configuration of inputs, the marginal products of land, labour, and capital, change by the same proportion in any region. However, for the experiment conducted, productivity changes and the spillover coefficients dominate the variable impact across sectors and regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Das, Gouranga, 2009. "How does trade-mediated technology transfer affect interregional and intersectoral competition? Exploring multi-sectoral effects in a global trade model," MPRA Paper 37256, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Jun 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:37256

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Stephen Kosempel, 2007. "Interaction between knowledge and technology: a contribution to the theory of development," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1237-1260, November.
    2. Hertel, Thomas, 1997. "Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and applications," GTAP Books, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, number 7685.
    3. Coe, David T & Helpman, Elhanan & Hoffmaister, Alexander W, 1997. "North-South R&D Spillovers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 134-149, January.
    4. Cohen, Wesley M & Levinthal, Daniel A, 1989. "Innovation and Learning: The Two Faces of R&D," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(397), pages 569-596, September.
    5. Gouranga Gopal Das & Alan A. Powell, 2000. "Absorption Capacity, Structural Similarity and Embodied Technology Spillovers in a 'Macro' Model: An Implementation Within the GTAP Framework," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers ip-77, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    6. Hans Meijl & Frank Tongeren, 1998. "Trade, technology spillovers, and food production in China," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 134(3), pages 423-449, September.
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    More about this item


    Absorptive capacity; capture parameter; trade; technology; Armington; TFP (total factor productivity);

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • F17 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Forecasting and Simulation
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity


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