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Government Expenditure and Household Consumption in Bangladesh through the Lens of Economic Theories: An Empirical Assessment


  • Mahmud, Mir Nahid
  • Ahmed, Mansur


The relationship between government and household consumption remains to be one of the contentious issues in both theories and empirics, though its’ immense importance in fiscal policy formulation. Like theories, the empirical studies regarding the relationship between government and household consumption provide opposing results. In this backdrop, the present study examines public-private consumption relationship for Bangladesh economy through the lens of economic theories using the cointegration and error correction modeling strategies to tackle the problem of non-stationary data. Two different variant of cointegration technique have been employed and in either case a valid long run positive relationship has been found. However, the error correction model has found an inverse relationship between public and private consumption in the short run. Finally, we test for Granger causality and find no long run causal relationship between government consumption and household consumption. In general, our finding goes with the Barro-Ricardian equivalence hypothesis of government spending that household consumption is unrelated with government consumption decision in the long-run.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahmud, Mir Nahid & Ahmed, Mansur, 2012. "Government Expenditure and Household Consumption in Bangladesh through the Lens of Economic Theories: An Empirical Assessment," MPRA Paper 36016, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:36016

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Günter Coenen & Roland Straub, 2005. "Does Government Spending Crowd in Private Consumption? Theory and Empirical Evidence for the Euro Area," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(3), pages 435-470, December.
    2. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    3. Karras, Georgios, 1994. "Government Spending and Private Consumption: Some International Evidence," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 26(1), pages 9-22, February.
    4. Granger, C. W. J., 1988. "Some recent development in a concept of causality," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1-2), pages 199-211.
    5. Ahmed, Shaghil, 1986. "Temporary and permanent government spending in an open economy: Some evidence for the United Kingdom," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 197-224, March.
    6. S. Illeris & G. Akehurst, 2001. "Introduction," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 1-4, January.
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    More about this item


    Government Consumption; Household Consumption; Ricardian Equivalence; Cointegration;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents

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