IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The reality about aid and governance: the threshold theory


  • Jaouadi, Saïd


The aim of this survey is to explain the real impact of aid on governance in the developing countries: including the subsahara and the MENA region during the period 1990-2004 by using the “threshold theory”. Stephen Knack proved that foreign aid had a harmful impact on the governance of the developing countries. But, in this study we used a new econometric approach to test the existence of a threshold and to determine its value. This methodology allowed us to find interesting results in the relation between aid and governance, in the short and in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaouadi, Saïd, 2011. "The reality about aid and governance: the threshold theory," MPRA Paper 33387, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Apr 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:33387

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bruce E. Hansen, 2000. "Sample Splitting and Threshold Estimation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(3), pages 575-604, May.
    2. Charles C. Chang & Eduardo Fernández-Arias & Luis Servén, 1998. "Measuring Aid Flows: A New Approach," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 1297, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Henrik Hansen & Finn Tarp, 2000. "Aid effectiveness disputed," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 375-398, April.
    4. Charles C. Chang & Eduardo Fernández-Arias & Luis Serven, 1998. "Measuring Aid Flows: A New Approach," Research Department Publications 4146, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Thapa, Narayan, 2014. "Foreign aid and its impact on governance in Nepal," MPRA Paper 58960, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    foreign aid; governance; threshold; institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:33387. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.