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How much you know matters: A note on the exchange rate disconnect puzzle

Author

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  • Onur, Esen

Abstract

This paper offers a dynamic model of the foreign exchange market where some investors in the market are more informed than others. By adjusting the proportion of informed investors in the market, it is shown that the disconnect between macroeconomic variables and the exchange rate is sensitive to the amount of asymmetric information in the market. A surprising fi�nding is that this disconnect is bigger when the proportion of informed investors in the market is smaller.

Suggested Citation

  • Onur, Esen, 2011. "How much you know matters: A note on the exchange rate disconnect puzzle," MPRA Paper 32772, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:32772
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/32772/1/MPRA_paper_32772.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin Evans and Dagfinn Rime, 2010. "Micro Approaches to foreign Exchange Determination," Working Papers gueconwpa~10-10-04, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.
    2. Flood, Robert P. & Rose, Andrew K., 1995. "Fixing exchange rates A virtual quest for fundamentals," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 3-37, August.
    3. Esen Onur, 2008. "The role of asymmetric information among investors in the foreign exchange market," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(4), pages 368-385.
    4. Bjonnes, Geir Hoidal & Rime, Dagfinn & Solheim, Haakon O.Aa., 2005. "Liquidity provision in the overnight foreign exchange market," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 175-196, March.
    5. Philippe Bacchetta & Eric Van Wincoop, 2006. "Can Information Heterogeneity Explain the Exchange Rate Determination Puzzle?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 552-576, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Market microstructure; Foreign exchange market; Asymmetric information;

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange

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