IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/2975.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Accelerating the calibration of stochastic volatility models

Author

Listed:
  • Kilin, Fiodar

Abstract

This paper compares the performance of three methods for pricing vanilla options in models with known characteristic function: (1) Direct integration, (2) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), (3) Fractional FFT. The most important application of this comparison is the choice of the fastest method for the calibration of stochastic volatility models, e.g. Heston, Bates, Barndor®-Nielsen-Shephard models or Levy models with stochastic time. We show that using additional cache technique makes the calibration with the direct integration method at least seven times faster than the calibration with the fractional FFT method.

Suggested Citation

  • Kilin, Fiodar, 2006. "Accelerating the calibration of stochastic volatility models," MPRA Paper 2975, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 22 Apr 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:2975
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/2975/1/MPRA_paper_2975.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Roger Lord & Remmert Koekkoek & Dick Van Dijk, 2010. "A comparison of biased simulation schemes for stochastic volatility models," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 177-194.
    2. Roger Lord & Christian Kahl, 2006. "Optimal Fourier Inversion in Semi-analytical Option Pricing," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 06-066/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 05 Jun 2007.
    3. Heston, Steven L, 1993. "A Closed-Form Solution for Options with Stochastic Volatility with Applications to Bond and Currency Options," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(2), pages 327-343.
    4. Roger Lord & Christian Kahl, 2006. "Why the Rotation Count Algorithm works," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 06-065/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Cristian Homescu, 2011. "Implied Volatility Surface: Construction Methodologies and Characteristics," Papers 1107.1834, arXiv.org.
    2. Inklaar, Robert & Koetter, Michael & Noth, Felix, 2012. "Who's afraid of big bad banks? Bank competition, SME, and industry growth," Frankfurt School - Working Paper Series 197, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.
    3. Dietmar Harhoff & Elisabeth Mueller & John Reenen, 2014. "What are the Channels for Technology Sourcing? Panel Data Evidence from German Companies," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(1), pages 204-224, March.
    4. Boeing, Philipp & Mueller, Elisabeth & Sandner, Philipp, 2012. "What makes Chinese firms productive? Learning from indigenous and foreign sources of knowledge," Frankfurt School - Working Paper Series 196, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.
    5. Marcos Escobar & Peter Hieber & Matthias Scherer, 2014. "Efficiently pricing double barrier derivatives in stochastic volatility models," Review of Derivatives Research, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 191-216, July.
    6. Arismendi, Juan C. & Back, Janis & Prokopczuk, Marcel & Paschke, Raphael & Rudolf, Markus, 2016. "Seasonal Stochastic Volatility: Implications for the pricing of commodity options," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 53-65.
    7. Susanne Griebsch & Uwe Wystup, 2011. "On the valuation of fader and discrete barrier options in Heston's stochastic volatility model," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(5), pages 693-709.
    8. Yuri F. Saporito & Xu Yang & Jorge P. Zubelli, 2017. "The Calibration of Stochastic-Local Volatility Models - An Inverse Problem Perspective," Papers 1711.03023, arXiv.org.
    9. Alexander Libman & Vladimir Kozlov & André Schultz, 2012. "Roving Bandits in Action: Outside Option and Governmental Predation in Autocracies," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(4), pages 526-562, November.
    10. Yu, Xiaofan, 2011. "A spatial interpretation of the persistency of China's provincial inequality," Frankfurt School - Working Paper Series 171, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.
    11. Mascagni Michael & Qiu Yue & Hin Lin-Yee, 2014. "High performance computing in quantitative finance: A review from the pseudo-random number generator perspective," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, De Gruyter, vol. 20(2), pages 101-120, June.
    12. Manfred Gilli & Enrico Schumann, 2010. "Calibrating Option Pricing Models with Heuristics," Working Papers 030, COMISEF.
    13. Böing, Philipp & Müller, Elisabeth, 2012. "Technological Capabilities of Chinese Enterprises: Who is Going to Compete Abroad?," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62081, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stochastic Volatility Models; Calibration; Numerical Integration; Fast Fourier Transform;

    JEL classification:

    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:2975. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.