IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Financial liberalization and contagion with unobservable savings


  • Panetti, Ettore


How do market-based channels for the provision of liquidity affect financial liberalization and contagion? In order to answer this question, I extend the Diamond and Dybvig (1983) model of financial intermediation to a two-country environment with unobservable markets for borrowing and lending and comparative advantages in the investment technologies. I demonstrate that the role of hidden markets crucially depends on the level of financial integration of the economy. Despite always imposing a burden on intermediaries, unobservable markets allow agents to partially enjoy gains from financial integration when interbank markets are autarkic. In fully liberalized systems such effect instead disappears. Similarly, in autarky the distortion created by hidden markets improve the resilience of the system to unexpected liquidity shocks. With fully integrated interbank markets, such effect again disappears, as unexpected liquidity shocks always lead to bankruptcy and contagion.

Suggested Citation

  • Panetti, Ettore, 2011. "Financial liberalization and contagion with unobservable savings," MPRA Paper 29540, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:29540

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rajkamal Iyer & José-Luis Peydró, 2011. "Interbank Contagion at Work: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(4), pages 1337-1377.
    2. Franklin Allen & Douglas Gale, 2004. "Financial Intermediaries and Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(4), pages 1023-1061, July.
    3. Pozsar, Zoltan & Adrian, Tobias & Ashcraft, Adam B. & Boesky, Hayley, 2013. "Shadow banking," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Dec, pages 1-16.
      • Zoltan Pozsar & Tobias Adrian & Adam B. Ashcraft & Hayley Boesky, 2010. "Shadow banking," Staff Reports 458, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    4. Masami Imai & Seitaro Takarabe, 2011. "Bank Integration and Transmission of Financial Shocks: Evidence from Japan," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 155-183, January.
    5. Emmanuel Farhi & Mikhail Golosov & Aleh Tsyvinski, 2009. "A Theory of Liquidity and Regulation of Financial Intermediation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(3), pages 973-992.
    6. Gorton, Gary, 1988. "Banking Panics and Business Cycles," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(4), pages 751-781, December.
    7. Panetti, Ettore, 2011. "Unobservable savings, risk sharing and default in the financial system," MPRA Paper 29542, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Mikhail Golosov & Aleh Tsyvinski, 2007. "Optimal Taxation with Endogenous Insurance Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(2), pages 487-534.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Ettore Panetti, 2017. "A Theory of Bank Illiquidity and Default with Hidden Trades," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 21(3), pages 1123-1157.
    2. Panetti, Ettore, 2011. "Unobservable savings, risk sharing and default in the financial system," MPRA Paper 29542, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    financial intermediation; financial liberalization; financial contagion; unobservable savings;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:29540. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.