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Demographic and Economic Trends: Implications for International Mobility

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  • Martin, Philip

Abstract

About three percent of the world’s 6.1 billion people were international migrants in 2000. Population growth is expected to slow between 2000 and 2050 in comparison to 1950-2000, but international migration is expected to rise as persisting demographic and economic inequalities that motivate migration interact with revolutions in communications and transportation that enable people to cross borders. The default policy option to manage what is sometimes deemed out-of-control migration, adjusting the rights of migrants, is unsatisfactory, prompting this review of longer term factors affecting migration patterns, including aging in industrial countries, rural-urban migration that spills over national borders, and the migration infrastructure of agents and networks that moves people. The paper concludes with an assessment of the likely effects of the 2008-09 recession on international migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin, Philip, 2009. "Demographic and Economic Trends: Implications for International Mobility," MPRA Paper 19199, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:19199
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/19199/1/MPRA_paper_19199.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rupa Chanda, 2001. "Movement of Natural Persons and the GATS," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(5), pages 631-654, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alessio Cangiano, 2014. "Elder Care and Migrant Labor in Europe: A Demographic Outlook," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 40(1), pages 131-154, March.
    2. Jessica Lichy & Kevin Pon, 2013. "The role of (foreign?) culture on consumer buying behaviour: What changes when living abroad?," Transnational Marketing Journal, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 1(1), pages 5-21, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Global population and labor force; aging; international migration; rural-urban migration; recession and migration;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General

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