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Agricultural Dualism, Incidence of Child Labour and Subsidy Policies

Author

Listed:
  • Dwibedi, Jayanta
  • Chaudhuri, Sarbajit

Abstract

This paper purports to examine the validity of the common belief that in a developing economy the backward agricultural sector should be subsidized as poorer group of the working population are employed in this sector that send their children out to work out of sheer poverty. A three-sector general equilibrium framework with agricultural dualism and child labour has been employed for the purpose of analysis. It finds that a price subsidy policy to backward agricultural sector is likely to aggravate the child labour incidence while a credit subsidy to advanced agriculture may be effective in reducing the gravity of the problem in the economy. The paper, therefore, questions the desirability of assisting backward agriculture for eradicating child labour in the society.

Suggested Citation

  • Dwibedi, Jayanta & Chaudhuri, Sarbajit, 2009. "Agricultural Dualism, Incidence of Child Labour and Subsidy Policies," MPRA Paper 18002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:18002
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/18002/1/MPRA_paper_18002.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kaushik Basu, 1999. "Child Labor: Cause, Consequence, and Cure, with Remarks on International Labor Standards," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1083-1119, September.
    2. Ranjan, Priya, 2001. "Credit constraints and the phenomenon of child labor," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 81-102, February.
    3. Jafarey, Saqib & Lahiri, Sajal, 2002. "Will trade sanctions reduce child labour?: The role of credit markets," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 137-156, June.
    4. Jean-Marie Baland & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Is Child Labor Inefficient?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 663-679, August.
    5. Sarbajit Chaudhuri & Jayanta Kumar Dwibedi, 2007. "Foreign Capital Inflow, Fiscal Policies And Incidence Of Child Labour In A Developing Economy," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 75(1), pages 17-46, January.
    6. Basu, Kaushik & Van, Pham Hoang, 1998. "The Economics of Child Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 412-427, June.
    7. Ranjan, Priya, 1999. "An economic analysis of child labor," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 99-105, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labour; general equilibrium; agricultural dualism; subsidy policy.;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General

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