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Revenue Targeting in Fisheries: The Case of Hawaii Longline Fishery

  • Nguyen, Quang
  • Leung, PinngSun

We apply the target revenue model, a version of prospect theory, to investigate how fishermen adjust their trip length to changes in daily revenue. The key finding is that certain groups of fishermen seem more likely to behave according to the target revenue model rather than the standard model of labor supply. Asian American captains seem more likely to behave according to the target revenue model than Caucasian captains. We also find that vessel capacity has little effect on the captain’s decision making behavior. The study strongly supports the integration of prospect theory into the framework of labor supply analysis.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/13846/1/MPRA_paper_13846.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 13846.

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Date of creation: 07 Mar 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:13846
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  1. Fehr, Ernst & Falk, Armin, 2002. "Psychological Foundations of Incentives," IZA Discussion Papers 507, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Ernst Fehr & Lorenz Goette, 2002. "Do workers work more if wages are high? Evidence from a randomized field experiment," Natural Field Experiments 00240, The Field Experiments Website.
  3. James H. Stock & Motohiro Yogo, 2002. "Testing for Weak Instruments in Linear IV Regression," NBER Technical Working Papers 0284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Götte, Lorenz & Huffman, David B. & Fehr, Ernst, 2003. "Loss Aversion and Labor Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 927, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Henry S. Farber, 2005. "Is Tomorrow Another Day? The Labor Supply of New York City Cabdrivers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 46-82, February.
  6. Henry S. Farber, 2008. "Reference-Dependent Preferences and Labor Supply: The Case of New York City Taxi Drivers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(3), pages 1069-82, June.
  7. George J. Borjas, 1980. "The Relationship between Wages and Weekly Hours of Work: The Role of Division Bias," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 15(3), pages 409-423.
  8. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119, March.
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