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Endogenous Timing with Government's Preference and Privatization

  • Kangsik, Choi

By introducing the government's preference for tax revenues into an extended game with observable delay, this study provides new insight into the trade-off between the government and the public firm's payoff in a government's optimal policy of privatization. The results show that: (i) regardless of the government's preference for tax revenues, the government does not have an incentive to privatize in an endogenous timing context even though there are conflicts of interest between the public firm and the government and (ii) under a mixed duopoly, each sequential-move equilibrium varies with the level of the government's preference for tax revenues.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/13844/1/MPRA_paper_13844.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 13844.

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Date of creation: 07 Mar 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:13844
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  1. Pal, Debashis, 1998. "Endogenous timing in a mixed oligopoly," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 181-185, November.
  2. Jacques, Armel, 2004. "Endogenous timing in a mixed oligopoly: a forgotten equilibrium," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 147-148, May.
  3. De Fraja, Giovanni, 1991. "Efficiency and Privatisation in Imperfectly Competitive Industries," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(3), pages 311-21, March.
  4. White, Mark D., 1996. "Mixed oligopoly, privatization and subsidization," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 189-195, November.
  5. Joanna Poyago-Theotoky, 2001. "Mixed oligopoly, subsidization and the order of firms' moves: an irrelevance result," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 12(3), pages 1-5.
  6. Michael J. Keen & Christos Kotsogiannis, 2002. "Does Federalism Lead to Excessively High Taxes?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 363-370, March.
  7. Fjell, Kenneth & Heywood, John S., 2004. "Mixed oligopoly, subsidization and the order of firm's moves: the relevance of privatization," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 83(3), pages 411-416, June.
  8. Forbes, Kevin F & Zampelli, Ernest M, 1989. "Is Leviathan a Mythical Beast?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(3), pages 568-77, June.
  9. Rudra Sensarma & Bibhas Saha, 2008. "The Distributive Role of Managerial Incentives in a Mixed Duopoly," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 12(28), pages 1-10.
  10. Marius BRÜLHART & Mario JAMETTI, 2007. "Does Tax Competition Tame the Leviathan?," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 07.09, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
  11. Edwards, Jeremy & Keen, Michael, 1996. "Tax competition and Leviathan," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 113-134, January.
  12. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:12:y:2008:i:28:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Toshihiro Matsumura, 2003. "Stackelberg Mixed Duopoly with a Foreign Competitor," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 275-287, 07.
  14. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:12:y:2002:i:1:p:1-6 is not listed on IDEAS
  15. Juan Bárcena-Ruiz, 2007. "Endogenous Timing in a Mixed Duopoly: Price Competition," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 91(3), pages 263-272, July.
  16. Zax, Jeffrey S, 1989. "Is There a Leviathan in Your Neighborhood?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(3), pages 560-67, June.
  17. Mujumdar, Sudesh & Pal, Debashis, 1998. "Effects of indirect taxation in a mixed oligopoly," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 199-204, February.
  18. Michael Rauscher, 2000. "Interjurisdictional Competition and Public-Sector Prodigality: The Triumph of the Market over the State?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 57(1), pages 89-, September.
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