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Analysis of Intergenerational Inequality: the Role of Public Expenditure and Taxation

  • Emanuele, Canegrati

In this paper I analyse the impact of public expenditure and income taxation on intergenerational inequality for seventeen countries. Age group Gini index is calculated by using data from the Luxemburg Income Study (LIS). Results are very robust in demonstrating that only income taxation is able to influence the level of intergenerational inequality, since it directly a¤ects the wealth of households. Otherwise, public expenditure seems to have no impact on individuals' welfare, even if we consider public expenditure components which should be tailored for specific cohorts. Different hypotheses on standard errors are considered, in order to detect the presence of one-way or two-way fixed effects.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 10926.

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Date of creation: 06 Oct 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:10926
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  1. Francesco Giavazzi & Tullio Jappelli & Marco Pagano, 1999. "Searching for Non-Keynesian Effects of Fiscal Policy," CSEF Working Papers 16, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  2. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2006. "Heteroskedasticity-Robust Standard Errors for Fixed Effects Panel Data Regression," NBER Technical Working Papers 0323, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Mark Huggett & Gustavo Ventura & Amir Yaron, 2010. "Sources of Lifetime Inequality," Working Papers 2011-020, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  4. Fatás, Antonio & Mihov, Ilian, 2001. "The Effects of Fiscal Policy on Consumption and Employment: Theory and Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 2760, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Mitchell A. Petersen, 2005. "Estimating Standard Errors in Finance Panel Data Sets: Comparing Approaches," NBER Working Papers 11280, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Antonio Afonso & Ludger Schuknecht & Vito Tanzi, 2010. "Public sector efficiency: evidence for new EU member states and emerging markets," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(17), pages 2147-2164.
  7. António Afonso & Ludger Schuknecht & Vito Tanzi, 2010. "Income distribution determinants and public spending efficiency," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 367-389, September.
  8. Gottschalk, Peter & Smeeding, Timothy M., 2000. "Empirical evidence on income inequality in industrialized countries," Handbook of Income Distribution, in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 5, pages 261-307 Elsevier.
  9. Cowell, F.A., 2000. "Measurement of inequality," Handbook of Income Distribution, in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 87-166 Elsevier.
  10. Peter H. Lindert, . "Three Centuries Of Inequality In Britain And America," Department of Economics 97-09, California Davis - Department of Economics.
  11. Afonso, António & Schuknecht, Ludger & Tanzi, Vito, 2003. "Public sector efficiency: an international comparison," Working Paper Series 0242, European Central Bank.
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