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Contagious Migration: Evidence from the Philippines

Author

Listed:
  • Abrigo, Michael Ralph M.
  • Desierto,Desiree A.

Abstract

Outward migration data from the Philippines exhibit spatial clustering. This is likely due to information spillover effects--fellow migrants share information with other neighboring migrants, thereby lowering the costs of migration. To verify this, we use spatial econometrics to define a geography-based network of migrants and estimate its effect on the growth in the number of succeeding migrants. We find that current and past migration from one municipality induces contemporaneous and future migration in neighboring municipalities.

Suggested Citation

  • Abrigo, Michael Ralph M. & Desierto,Desiree A., 2011. "Contagious Migration: Evidence from the Philippines," Discussion Papers DP 2011-18, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:phd:dpaper:dp_2011-18
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Javorcik, Beata S. & Özden, Çaglar & Spatareanu, Mariana & Neagu, Cristina, 2011. "Migrant networks and foreign direct investment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 231-241, March.
    2. Woodruff, Christopher & Zenteno, Rene, 2007. "Migration networks and microenterprises in Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 509-528, March.
    3. Mr. Ray Brooks & Tao Ran, 2003. "China's Labor Market Performance and Challenges," IMF Working Papers 2003/210, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Kaivan Munshi, 2003. "Networks in the Modern Economy: Mexican Migrants in the U. S. Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(2), pages 549-599.
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    Cited by:

    1. Diwa C Guinigundo, 2018. "The globalisation experience and its challenges for the Philippine economy," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Globalisation and deglobalisation, volume 100, pages 259-272, Bank for International Settlements.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; Philippines; fiduciary system; global imbalances; network effects; spatial econometrics;
    All these keywords.

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