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Modeling and forecasting realized range volatility


  • Massimiliano Caporin

    () (University of Padova)

  • Gabriel G. Velo

    () (University of Padova)


In this paper, we estimate, model and forecast Realized Range Volatility, a new realized measure and estimator of the quadratic variation of financial prices. This estimator was early introduced in the literature and it is based on the high-low range observed at high frequency during the day. We consider the impact of the microstructure noise in high frequency data and correct our estimations, following a known procedure. Then, we model the Realized Range accounting for the well-known stylized effects present in financial data. We consider an HAR model with asymmetric effects with respect to the volatility and the return, and GARCH and GJR-GARCH specifications for the variance equation. Moreover, we also consider a non Gaussian distribution for the innovations. The analysis of the forecast performance during the different periods suggests that including the HAR components in the model improve the point forecasting accuracy while the introduction of asymmetric effects only leads to minor improvements.

Suggested Citation

  • Massimiliano Caporin & Gabriel G. Velo, 2011. "Modeling and forecasting realized range volatility," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0128, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
  • Handle: RePEc:pad:wpaper:0128

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Andersen T. G & Bollerslev T. & Diebold F. X & Labys P., 2001. "The Distribution of Realized Exchange Rate Volatility," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 96, pages 42-55, March.
    2. Fulvio Corsi & Stefan Mittnik & Christian Pigorsch & Uta Pigorsch, 2008. "The Volatility of Realized Volatility," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1-3), pages 46-78.
    3. Martens, Martin & van Dijk, Dick, 2007. "Measuring volatility with the realized range," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 138(1), pages 181-207, May.
    4. Kim Christensen & Mark Podolskij & Mathias Vetter, 2009. "Bias-correcting the realized range-based variance in the presence of market microstructure noise," Finance and Stochastics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 239-268, April.
    5. Martens, Martin & van Dijk, Dick & de Pooter, Michiel, 2009. "Forecasting S&P 500 volatility: Long memory, level shifts, leverage effects, day-of-the-week seasonality, and macroeconomic announcements," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 282-303.
    6. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Peter Reinhard Hansen & Asger Lunde & Neil Shephard, 2008. "Designing Realized Kernels to Measure the ex post Variation of Equity Prices in the Presence of Noise," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 76(6), pages 1481-1536, November.
    7. Fulvio Corsi, 2009. "A Simple Approximate Long-Memory Model of Realized Volatility," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 7(2), pages 174-196, Spring.
    8. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Shephard, 2002. "Econometric analysis of realized volatility and its use in estimating stochastic volatility models," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 64(2), pages 253-280.
    9. F. M. Bandi & J. R. Russell, 2008. "Microstructure Noise, Realized Variance, and Optimal Sampling," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(2), pages 339-369.
    10. Patton, Andrew J., 2011. "Volatility forecast comparison using imperfect volatility proxies," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 160(1), pages 246-256, January.
    11. Hansen, Peter R. & Lunde, Asger, 2006. "Realized Variance and Market Microstructure Noise," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 24, pages 127-161, April.
    12. Christensen, Kim & Podolskij, Mark, 2007. "Realized range-based estimation of integrated variance," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 141(2), pages 323-349, December.
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    More about this item


    Statistical analysis of financial data; Econometrics; Forecasting methods; Time series analysis; Realized Range Volatility; Realized Volatility; Long-memory; Volatility forecasting;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • C58 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Financial Econometrics

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