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Bank Pay Caps, Bank Risk, and Macroprudential Regulation

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  • John Thanassoulis

Abstract

This paper studies the consequences of a regulatory pay cap in proportion to assets onbank risk, bank value, and bank asset allocations. The cap is shown to lower banks' riskand raise banks' values by acting against a competitive externality in the labour market.The risk reduction is achieved without the possibility of reduced lending from a Tier 1increase. The cap encourages diversi cation and reduces the need a bank has to focus ona limited number of asset classes. The cap can be used for Macroprudential Regulationto encourage banks to move resources away from wholesale banking to the retail bankingsector. Such an intervention would be targeted: in 2009 a 20% reduction in remunerationwould have been equivalent to more than 150 basis points of extra tier 1 for UBS, forexample.

Suggested Citation

  • John Thanassoulis, 2012. "Bank Pay Caps, Bank Risk, and Macroprudential Regulation," Economics Series Working Papers 636, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:636
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    File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/12500/paper636.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gete, Pedro & Gomez, Juan Pedro, 2017. "Dealing with Overleverage: Restricting Leverage vs. Restricting Variable Compensation," MPRA Paper 80642, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Jeong-Bon Kim & Li Li & Mary L. Z. Ma & Frank M. Song, 2013. "CEO Option Compensation, Risk-Taking Incentives, and Systemic Risk in the Banking Industry," Working Papers 182013, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    3. repec:kap:regeco:v:53:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11149-018-9352-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Gete, Pedro & Gómez, Juan-Pedro, 2015. "Compensation contracts and fire sales," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 154-171.
    5. Eberhard Feess & Ansgar Wohlschlegel, 2018. "Bank capital requirements and mandatory deferral of compensation," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 53(2), pages 206-242, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Remuneration; compensation; bonuses; capital conservation; systemic bank risk;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

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