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Institutionen und historische Grenzen

  • Jürgen Jerger

    ()

    (IOS Regensburg)

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    The relevance of (political) borders on the one hand and of historical conditions on the other hand for some of today’s aspects of ec onomic and social reality is well established in both theoretical and empirical research in economics as wel as in other disciplines. More surprising are empirical results that point to a long-lasting relevance of historical borders that may still exert causal on effects on present conditions and observations. This paper argues that the explanation of these effects is a demanding, albeit potentially very rewarding challenge for institutional economics in particular and an interdisciplinary research program in general.

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    File URL: http://www.dokumente.ios-regensburg.de/publikationen/wp/wp_336.pdf
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    Paper provided by Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies) in its series Working Papers with number 336.

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    Length: 24
    Date of creation: Dec 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ost:wpaper:336
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    1. Kurt Geppert & Michael Happich & Andreas Stephan, 2004. "Regional disparities in the European Union: Convergence and Agglomeration," ERSA conference papers ersa04p219, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Cheptea, Angela, 2011. "Border Effects and European Integration," MPRA Paper 47009, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Acemoglu, Daron & Cantoni, Davide & Johnson, Simon & Robinson, James A., 2011. "The consequences of radical reform: The French revolution," Munich Reprints in Economics 20170, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    4. Young, Allyn A., 1928. "Increasing Returns and Economic Progress," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 38, pages 527-542.
    5. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2000. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 485, Boston College Department of Economics.
    6. Angela Cheptea, 2010. "Border Effects and East-West Integration," Working Papers SMART - LERECO 10-15, INRA UMR SMART.
    7. Avinash Dixit, 1992. "Investment and Hysteresis," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(1), pages 107-132, Winter.
    8. Xavier X. Sala-i-Martin, 1997. "I Just Ran Four Million Regressions," NBER Working Papers 6252, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Olivier J. Blanchard & Lawrence H. Summers, 1986. "Hysteresis and the European Unemployment Problem," Working papers 427, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    10. Jati Sengupta & Kumiko Okamura, 1995. "History versus expectations: test of new growth theory," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(12), pages 491-494.
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