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The Cyclical Behavior of Job Creation and Job Destruction


  • Dale Mortensen
  • Christopher Pissarides


Panel studies show that job creation and job destruction coexist at all phase of the business cycle. In this paper, we develop a model of endogenous job destruction in response to persistent idiosyncratic shocks and incorporate the model into he transactions cost (matching) approach to equilibrium job creation and wage determination. Second, we examine the dynamic stochastic implications of the model for co-movement between job creation, job destruction, and the employment growth induced by a common aggregate shock to productivity. Finally, a simulation of the model for a reasonable parametrization demonstrates that it can explain cyclical properties of US Manufacturing data.

Suggested Citation

  • Dale Mortensen & Christopher Pissarides, 1992. "The Cyclical Behavior of Job Creation and Job Destruction," Discussion Papers 982, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  • Handle: RePEc:nwu:cmsems:982

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Prescott, Edward C., 1986. "Theory ahead of business-cycle measurement," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 11-44, January.
    2. Hansen, Gary D., 1985. "Indivisible labor and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 309-327, November.
    3. Caballero, Ricardo J & Hammour, Mohamad L, 1994. "The Cleansing Effect of Recessions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1350-1368, December.
    4. Christiano, Lawrence J, 1990. "Solving the Stochastic Growth Model by Linear-Quadratic Approximation and by Value-Function Iteration," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 8(1), pages 23-26, January.
    5. Kenneth L. Judd, 1991. "Minimum weighted residual methods for solving aggregate growth models," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 49, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    6. Steven J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 1992. "Gross Job Creation, Gross Job Destruction, and Employment Reallocation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(3), pages 819-863.
    7. Oliver Jean Blanchard & Peter Diamond, 1989. "The Beveridge Curve," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 20(1), pages 1-76.
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    Cited by:

    1. L'Haridon, Olivier & Malherbet, Franck, 2002. "Unemployment Compensation Finance and Aggregate Employment Fluctuations," CEPR Discussion Papers 3614, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. John Baldwin & Timothy Dunne & John Haltiwanger, 1998. "A Comparison Of Job Creation And Job Destruction In Canada And The United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(3), pages 347-356, August.
    3. Shi, Shouyong, 1998. "Search for a Monetary Propagation Mechanism," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 314-352, August.
    4. Caballero, Ricardo J & Engel, Eduardo M R A & Haltiwanger, John, 1997. "Aggregate Employment Dynamics: Building from Microeconomic Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 115-137, March.
    5. Ricardo A. Lagos, "undated". "An Alternative Approach to Market Frictions: An Application to the Market for Taxicab Rides," Penn CARESS Working Papers 058589d20e3fbe4e559adb44b, Penn Economics Department.
    6. Harald Dale-Olsen & Dag Rønningen, 2000. "The Importance of Definitions of Data and Observation Frequen-cies for Job and Worker Flows - Norwegian Experiences 1996-1997," Discussion Papers 278, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

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