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Does Providing Information to Drivers Reduce Traffic Congestion?

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  • Richard Arnott

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  • Richard Arnott, 1989. "Does Providing Information to Drivers Reduce Traffic Congestion?," Discussion Papers 864, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  • Handle: RePEc:nwu:cmsems:864
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    File URL: http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/research/math/papers/864.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Haltiwanger, John & Waldman, Michael, 1985. "Rational Expectations and the Limits of Rationality: An Analysis of Heterogeneity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 326-340, June.
    2. Moshe Ben-Akiva & Andre de Palma & Pavlos Kanaroglou, 1986. "Dynamic Model of Peak Period Traffic Congestion with Elastic Arrival Rates," Transportation Science, INFORMS, vol. 20(3), pages 164-181, August.
    3. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1971. "The Private and Social Value of Information and the Reward to Inventive Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(4), pages 561-574, September.
    4. Richard Arnott, 1986. "Information and Time-Of-Use Decisions in Stochastically Congestable Facilities," Discussion Papers 788, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
    5. Arnott, Richard & de Palma, Andre & Lindsey, Robin, 1990. "Economics of a bottleneck," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 111-130, January.
    6. Small, Kenneth A, 1982. "The Scheduling of Consumer Activities: Work Trips," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 467-479, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Arnott, Richard & Rowse, John, 1999. "Modeling Parking," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 97-124, January.
    2. van Ackere, Ann & Larsen, Erik R., 2004. "Self-organising behaviour in the presence of negative externalities: A conceptual model of commuter choice," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 157(2), pages 501-513, September.
    3. André De Palma & Nathalie Picard, 2005. "Congestion on risky routes with risk adverse drivers," ERSA conference papers ersa05p423, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Romeo Danielis & Edoardo Marcucci, 1999. "Bottleneck Congestion and Modal Split Revisited," Working Papers 1999.5, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    5. Richard Arnott, 1994. "Alleviating Traffic Congestion: Alternatives to Road Pricing," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 282., Boston College Department of Economics.
    6. Ian W.H. Parry, 2009. "Pricing Urban Congestion," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 461-484, September.

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