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Dynamic Model of Peak Period Traffic Congestion with Elastic Arrival Rates

Author

Listed:
  • Moshe Ben-Akiva
  • Andre de Palma
  • Pavlos Kanaroglou

Abstract

This paper develops a dynamic model of peak period traffic congestion that considers a limited number of bottlenecks. The model predicts the temporal distribution of traffic volumes with an elastic demand model. The choice of route and mode are dependent on travel times and costs. The choice of departure time is based on the tradeoff between travel time and schedule delay. Delays at bottlenecks are modelled with a deterministic queueing model that determines waiting times. This model is used to perform simulation experiments to analyze the impacts of alternative pricing policies and preferential treatment of High Occupancy Vehicles.

Suggested Citation

  • Moshe Ben-Akiva & Andre de Palma & Pavlos Kanaroglou, 1984. "Dynamic Model of Peak Period Traffic Congestion with Elastic Arrival Rates," Working Papers 588, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:qed:wpaper:588
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Arnott, 1989. "Does Providing Information to Drivers Reduce Traffic Congestion?," Discussion Papers 864, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
    2. Anthony Ziegelmeyer & Frédéric Koessler & Kene Boun My & Laurent Denant-Boèmont, 2008. "Road Traffic Congestion and Public Information: An Experimental Investigation," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 42(1), pages 43-82, January.
    3. Daniel, Joseph I, 1995. "Congestion Pricing and Capacity of Large Hub Airports: A Bottleneck Model with Stochastic Queues," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 63(2), pages 327-370, March.
    4. Verhoef, Erik T., 1999. "Time, speeds, flows and densities in static models of road traffic congestion and congestion pricing," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 341-369, May.
    5. Small, Kenneth A., 2015. "The bottleneck model: An assessment and interpretation," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 110-117.
    6. William Lam & Hai-jun Huang, 2002. "A combined activity/travel choice model for congested road networks with queues," Transportation, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 5-29, February.
    7. David Levinson & Ajay Kumar, 1995. "Activity, Travel, and the Allocation of Time," Working Papers 199505, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
    8. repec:eee:transb:v:102:y:2017:i:c:p:162-179 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. André De Palma & Claude LefÈvre, 2018. "Bottleneck models and departure time problems," Working Papers hal-01581519, HAL.
    10. Gonzales, Eric J., 2016. "Demand responsive transit systems with time-dependent demand: User equilibrium, system optimum, and management strategyAuthor-Name: Amirgholy, Mahyar," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 92(PB), pages 234-252.
    11. Gonzales, Eric J., 2015. "Coordinated pricing for cars and transit in cities with hypercongestion," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 64-81.
    12. Richard Arnott, 1992. "Information and Usage of Congestible Facilities Under Free Access," Discussion Papers 974, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
    13. Small, K. & Noland, R. & Koskenoja, P., 1995. "Socio-economic Attributes And Impacts Of Travel Reliability: A Stated Preference Approach," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt82n2w53k, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
    14. repec:eee:transb:v:100:y:2017:i:c:p:255-283 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Richard J. Arnott & Anatolii Kokoza & Mehdi Naji, 2015. "A Model of Rush-Hour Traffic in an Isotropic Downtown Area," CESifo Working Paper Series 5465, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. Kenneth Small, 2015. "The Bottleneck Model: An Assessment and Interpretation," Working Papers 141506, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
    17. Donald K. Richter & John Griffin & Richard Arnott, 1990. "Computation of Dynamic User Equilibria in a Model of Peak Period Traffic Congestion with Heterogenous Commuters," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 198, Boston College Department of Economics.

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